news    views    talk    learn    |    about    contribute     republish     crowdfunding     archives     events
Horizon brings you news and features about thought-provoking science and innovative research projects from across Europe. Horizon is written by independent science journalists and is funded by the European Commission's Directorate-General for Research and Innovation.
Image courtesy of flora robotica, Photo by Anders Ingvartsen, CITA

Robots and plants are being intricately linked into a new type of living technology that its creators believe could be used to grow a house.

by   -   March 15, 2017

If you take humans out of the driving seat, could traffic jams, accidents and high fuel bills become a thing of the past? As cars become more automated and connected, attention is turning to how to best choreograph the interaction between the tens or hundreds of automated vehicles that will one day share the same segment of Europe’s road network.

by   -   March 13, 2017

Automated cars are hurtling towards us at breakneck speed, with all-electric Teslas already running limited autopilot systems on roads worldwide and Google trialling its own autonomous pod cars. However, before we can reply to emails while being driven to work, we have to have a foolproof way to determine when drivers can safely take control and when it should be left to the car.

Housebuilders and makers of car parts in a few decades time may need nothing more than a large robotic arm, some raw ingredients and a programmable design, thanks to the next-generation of 3D printing machines which are opening up the technique to large-scale industry.

Being interviewed at home by a border guard avatar could be the first step in checking the identities of people who want to come into the EU from external countries if researchers working on new technologies to speed up border crossings while maintaining security levels have their way.

Meet the submersibles and seaborne machines helping to monitor climate change in our oceans. Originally posted on Horizon: The EU research and innovation magazine.

by   -   November 21, 2016

Space will soon be within the grasp of everyday people, small countries, researchers or start-up companies thanks to a fleet of low-cost launch vehicles under development across Europe.

By Ethan Bilby.

Field robots and plane-based remote sensors can patrol the earth and the sky to monitor the gases that cause climate change. Standing on three large wheels that help it avoid getting stuck in the soil, the Field Flux robot is able to lower two sampling chambers held on large arms to test soils for tiny amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O).

After a natural disaster strikes, emergency workers can often struggle to cope with destroyed buildings obstructing routes to injured people, fires engulfing entire forests at a bewildering rate, and storms blinding search and rescue operations. Now with EU-funded RECONASS project, drones and satellite technology can help emergency workers in post-disaster scenarios.

By mimicking the ways that queen bees vibrate, scientists have created robots that can fool bees into accepting them as members of the hive, and the results are giving beekeepers new insight into population behaviour.

by   -   May 16, 2016

Europe’s waters have never been busier. Between fishing boats, tourist cruisers, and underwater turbines, marine habitats around the continent have never before needed a more watchful eye.

With warmer winters and drier summers, climate change might even be having an effect on your favourite bottle of wine.

Animals have evolved sophisticated ways of processing sensory data to make sense of their surroundings. Now, robotics researchers are drawing inspiration from biological processes to improve the way machines handle information, perceive their surroundings, and react to stimuli.

Octopusby Rex Merrifield

Keyhole, or minimally invasive, surgery can offer many benefits over more traditional, open operations, including reduced risk of infections, quicker recovery times and less scarring. But internal organs can get in the way when hard robotic arms are used, given that access can be very limited and soft tissue can sometimes move in unexpected ways.

by   -   April 1, 2016

The last place you might expect to find drones and rovers is checking up on a corn field, but they could soon join tractors and ploughs on a farmer’s list of must-have agricultural tools, thanks to their potential to reduce pesticide use and increase the amount of crops that can be grown.


Month:



contributors:



.