news    views    talk    learn    |    about    contribute     republish     crowdfunding     archives     events
Rich Mahoney, Ph.D., is the director of the robotics program at SRI International. He has more than 20 years of experience in research, development, and commercialization of healthcare robotics technology, with a particular emphasis on assistive and therapeutic applications. At SRI, Mahoney leads a team working on cutting-edge robotics projects, including advanced component technologies and telemanipulation, for healthcare, security, and consumer applications. Prior to joining SRI, Mahoney was general manager of the U.S. operations of Motorika, Inc., an early-stage medical device company specializing in technology for neurorehabilitation. Previously, he was the director of business development for Applied Resources Corp., and co-director of the Robotics Laboratory of the Applied Science and Engineering Labs at the University of Delaware and A.I. DuPont Institute. Mahoney received his B.S. and M.S. from Drexel University in Pennsylvania. He earned a Ph.D. in engineering from the University of Cambridge, England, while attending on a Fulbright Scholarship.

taurus-2015x

Every April, National Robotics Week fuels a heightened awareness around robotics, its impact on society, and its growing importance in a wide variety of fields and applications. Robotics, however, never seems to achieve its hyped potential from its beginnings in industrial applications, when the benefits of fast, precise, repetitive manipulation in manufacturing were a significant driver for adoption of early robotics solutions. While robot arms in manufacturing debuted the benefits of robotics technology to industry, the robot arms were put in cages and they largely stayed in those environments.

As part of our series on ‘High-Risk / High-Reward’ robotics, I interviewed SRI International‘s Director of Robotics, Rich Mahoney, who’s role there is to help identify important emerging robotics technologies, align them with the needs of funding sources, and bring them successfully to market.

by   -   April 15, 2013

Although there is a surge in early stage personal and service robotics activity right now, it will take time to find out which technologies and companies will be the real winners, and only then will we learn the real affect on the overall jobs picture. I do believe, though, that we will see a new set of ROI’s emerge that will alter the jobs landscape, resulting in new jobs in a growing US-based robotics industry, as well as new job skills required to work synergistically with safe service robots.


Month:



contributors:



.