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3D printing

by ,   -   November 18, 2014
Supermagnetic_Twist_Acutator_ETHZ
Illustration of the different micro-actuators that can be coated with active compounds. (Illustration: Peters C et al. Advanced Functional Materials 2014, reprinted with permission of Wiley.)

Researchers have developed improved forms of tiny magnetic actuators thanks to new materials and a microscopic 3D printing technology.

by   -   November 10, 2014

At Maker Club, we make 3D printed robotics projects that teach electronics, programming and CAD design. Every project is remote controlled using our Arduino-based bluetooth chip, the MakerConnect, and our iOS and Android apps. Check out our Indiegogo campaign!

by   -   May 28, 2013

Three dimensional printing turns bits into atoms. The technology is simply amazing. These machines draw on programming, art and engineering to enable people to design and build intricate, beautiful, functional jewelry, machine parts, toys and even shoes. In the commercial sector, 3D printing can revolutionize supply chains as well. As the public interest group Public Knowledge wrote once, “It will be awesome if they don’t screw it up.”

by   -   May 21, 2013


color4Mataerial
is a new 3D printing method that uses extrusion technology and a two-component thermosetting polymer to build up objects on any working surface that the polymer can adhere to, including floors, walls and ceilings, without the need for additional support structures.  While other 3D printing methods build up objects by successive 2D layering, this process truly builds up objects in all three dimensions: a script takes 3D models designed by the user in CAD software, converts them into 3D curves and then these 3D curves are converted into paths that are fed to the robotic arm. By combining these 3D curves, a variety of shapes can be achieved that would be impossible with other 3D printing methods.

by   -   January 30, 2013

B9CreatorColors

Following an extremely successful Kickstarter campaign, which brought in more than ten times their original goal, B9Creator has begun accepting preorders for their high-resolution 3D printer kits. The B9Creator printer works through a photolithographic process, using a resin that cures in response to exposure to high-frequency (blue) visible light. This resin is held in a vat with a transparent base, and exposed to light from an upward pointing projector mounted below. B9Creator has provided an extensive collection of tutorial videos for assembling and using their printer.

by   -   July 8, 2012

 

Above, researchers at UPenn and MIT print blood vessels, using sugar. Once the sugar hardens, cells suspended in gel are added. Once the gel solidifies, the sugar is dissolved and removed. Below, another video shows a process where powdered stainless steel is printed using a binder (weak glue), then infused with bronze.

by   -   June 10, 2011

Recent examples of 3D printing include intricate meshed titanium gloves and plastic bikinis.
Apple had to use prototyping 3D printers from Japan because it couldn’t manufacture a critical iPad part in time.
All sorts of apps – in the UK they’re remaking wing parts in lighter titanium because every pound lightened saves $2,000 in annual fuel costs.
MakerBot, an entry level machine, has sold more than 4,000 so far.