news    views    talk    learn    |    about    contribute     republish     crowdfunding     archives     calls/events

Tag : bio-inspired

by   -   May 21, 2014

Rolf_Pfeifer

Source: University of Zurich Mediadesk

Watch Rolf Pfeifer’s farewell lecture at the University of Zurich, broadcasting live on Robohub Friday May 23, 2014 (18:00–19:30 CEST/16:00–17:30 UTC).

One of the most prominent figures in the “embodied intelligence” approach to AI, and the intellectual father of the Roboy humanoid, Rolf Pfeifer and his Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (AI Lab) at the University of Zurich have been a force of influence on the fields of robotics and AI for almost 30 years.

by   -   April 10, 2014

PatrickvanderSmagtGuest talk in the ShanghAI Lectures, 2010-10-21

In this guest presentation, Patrick van der Smagt talks about biomimetic approaches to robot control, kinematics, grasping, and ways to use the human body to control robots.

by ,   -   March 25, 2014

When it comes to complex tasks like building a house, many people with different skills work together to accomplish a single, larger goal. Instead of trying to create a perfect robot capable of building a house solo, could scientists replicate how humans function and make a “swarm” of imperfect robots capable of working together to accomplish complex tasks? This is the question Dr. Jekan Thanga hopes to answer. Thanga is one of the leading researchers who are applying bio-inspired neuro-evolutionary methods to robotics, and heads up Arizona State University’s Space and Terrestrial Robotic Exploration Laboratory.

by ,   -   March 19, 2014

What looks like a fish, swims like a fish but isn’t a fish? The latest in soft-bodied robots created by team of engineers of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

by   -   March 18, 2014

Lecture 8-II: Education and Industry Session

This lecture hosted by Prof. Samia Nefti-Meziani from the University of Salford, Manchester, UK, is about higher education and industrial impact of the ‘ShanghAI paradigm’. You should not be surprised to see early glimpses of the next industrial revolution enabled by intelligent machines in Manchester – this was the iconic example of industrial city during the very first industrial revolution.

“ITN Marie Curie Network SMART-E: Advanced Robotics for Sustainable Manufacturing in Europe” by  Samia Nefti-Meziani

by ,   -   March 10, 2014

bio-hybrid_machine_Taher_Saif

Photo by Alex Jerez Roman, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

A paper in Nature Communications earlier this year reports on “bio-bots”. These tiny machines inspired by sperm, are a hybrid combination of live heart cells and a synthetic polymer body.

The new bots, developed by researchers from the University of Illinois and Arizona State University, are the first swimming micro-machines that mimic the flagellar movement of sperm to traverse the viscous fluids of biological environments. This means they can propel themselves onward, fired by the contractile power of heart cells.

by   -   January 10, 2014

In today’s episode Per Sjöborg speaks with Giulio Sandini, director of the Robotics, Brain and Cognitive Sciences department at the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), about how he eventually came to study robotics after starting out as a vision scientist in the field of bioengineering. They talk about why interdisciplinary work is important to robotics, and how diverse teams of engineers, biologists, psychologists, mathematicians, physicists, and medical doctors can learn from each other; Sandini follows up with several examples of interdisciplinary success at the IIT including the iCub and COMAN humanoid platforms, the HyQ quadruped, and their work in rehabilitation robotics.

by   -   November 1, 2013

ShanghAI Lectures logoAnimal locomotion control is in a large part based on central pattern generators (CPGs), which are neural networks capable of producing complex rhythmic patterns while being activated and modulated by relatively simple control signals. These networks are located in the spinal cord for vertebrate animals. In this talk, I will present how mathematical models and robots can be used as tools to get a better understanding of the functioning of these circuits. In particular I will present how we model CPGs of lower vertebrates (lamprey and salamander) using systems of coupled oscillators, and how we test the CPG models on board of amphibious robots, such as a new salamander-like robot capable of swimming and walking. I will also show how the concept of CPGs implemented as coupled oscillators can be a useful control paradigm for various types of articulated robots from snake to humanoid robots.

by   -   October 30, 2013

gimball

Gimball is a flying robot that survives collisions. It weighs just 370g for 34cm in diameter. Photo credit: A. Herzog, EPFL.

Generally, flying robots are programmed to avoid obstacles, which is far from easy in cluttered environments. At the Laboratory of Intelligent Systems, we think that flying robots should be able to physically interact with their surroundings. Take insects: they often collide with obstacles and continue flying afterwards. We thus designed GimBall, a flying robot that can collide with objects seamlessly. Thanks to a passively rotating spherical cage, it remains stable even after taking hits from all sides. This approach enables GimBall to fly in the most difficult places without complex sensors.

by   -   September 20, 2013

In this episode Matthew Schroyer speaks with Nick Kohut, CEO of Dash Robotics, about their foldable hexapod robot and the ongoing crowdfunding campaign to get them into the hands of budding engineers, kids and hobbyists.

by   -   September 6, 2013

In this episode we speak with Nils Napp from the Self-organizing Systems Research Group at the Wyss Institute at Harvard University.

Napp tells us about his project to create robots that can reliably build structures in uncertain, unstructured terrain. Like termites that can build complex structures using shapeless materials like mud, his robots build structures out of foam, toothpicks or bags of sand.

by ,   -   July 17, 2013

Autonomously flying robots — also called small-scale unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) — are more and more exploited in civil and commercial applications for monitoring, surveillance, and disaster response. For some applications, it is beneficial if a team of coordinated UAVs rather than a single UAV is employed. Multiple UAVs can cover a given area faster or take photos from different perspectives at the same time. This emerging technology is still at an early stage and, consequently, profound research and development efforts are needed.