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Tag : ETHZ

by ,   -   November 18, 2014
Supermagnetic_Twist_Acutator_ETHZ
Illustration of the different micro-actuators that can be coated with active compounds. (Illustration: Peters C et al. Advanced Functional Materials 2014, reprinted with permission of Wiley.)

Researchers have developed improved forms of tiny magnetic actuators thanks to new materials and a microscopic 3D printing technology.

ARMin neuro-rehabilitation device
ARMin neuro-rehabilitation device.

In this pair of video lectures, Robert Riener presents his team’s research efforts in the field of rehabilitation robotics, and describes the vision behind Cybathlon, the competition for robot-assisted parathletes.

by   -   October 7, 2014

The future is in the hands of tiny robots, really tiny robots — and the expectation is that they will perform miraculous tasks, such as eye surgery and environmental cleanup.

by   -   July 24, 2014

With industry losses worth US$23 billion per year, illegal fishing represents a major global problem. But unmanned aircraft patrols have proven to be a viable solution.

by   -   June 20, 2014

Technology to allow you to adopt uncomfortable poses for long periods of time

Noonee® is a new Start Up company coming out of research in robotics in Switzerland. Aimed at solving healthcare problems within the manufacturing industry, noonee adopts a Chairless Chair® approach.

by   -   March 4, 2014

Drone-Failsafe-Algorithm

UPDATE 04/03/2014:

In this video update, we show that a quadrocopter can be safely piloted by hand after a motor fails, without the aid of a motion capture system. This follows our previous video, where we demonstrated how a complete propeller failure can be automatically detected, and that a quadrocopter can still maintain stable flight despite the complete loss of a propeller. 

by   -   December 17, 2013
Autonomous-Christmas-Lab-2013-Web
The Autonomous Systems Lab at ETH Zurich proudly presents this year’s Robotics Christmas Video:

Movement at night and a stolen tree, who the heck let the robots free? They gather and cheer, could Christmas be here?

by   -   November 18, 2013

quadrotor_DAndrea_IDSC_ETHZ_FMA

Quadrocopters assembling tensile structures in the ETH Flying Machine Arena. Photo credit: Professorship for Architecture and Digital Fabrication and the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control, ETH Zurich.

The team at the ETH Flying Machine Arena has released three new videos, demonstrating quadrotors building tensile structures, tossing a ball back and forth, and refining a figure-eight trajectory using iterative learning. Worth the watch!!

SIR_Students_at_shipyard

Students take a research tour with Damen ship repairs in Rotterdam.

A team of students from ETH Zurich and ZHdK have developed a prototype for a robotic ship inspection unit that is capable of conducting visual inspections of ship ballasts. Ballast inspection – which involves navigating hard-to-reach spots with no line of sight, often in the presence of intense heat, humidity, and hazardous gases – is normally done by human inspectors, and represents a significant cost to ship-owners who must pay for dry-docking and who face lost income when they cannot operate their ships during the inspection period. Because robotic ship inspection can occur while the ship is in operation, it could significantly reduce dry-dock time. The Ship Inspection Robot (SIR), which was developed in conjunction with Alstom Inspection Robotics and which uses magnetic wheels to navigate the I-beams and other awkward obstacles found inside ship ballast, is relatively compact and does not require any cables for power or communication, and thus offers significant mobility improvements over other robotic ship inspection prototypes. Project leaders anticipate that a per unit production cost could be as low as €4K, enabling shipping companies to operate several units in parallel as an additional time-saving measure. The robot was developed as part of a Bachelor-level project that aims to give students practical experience and promote contacts with industry.

by ,   -   July 11, 2013

For many people, the term “innovation” implies having a great idea, and hoping that somehow it will take off. According to H. Chesbrough, this is clearly insufficient, and in his definition, he is very specific and demanding: an innovation is an invention that has been developed into a novel product or service, and which is creating economic value. Or simply stated: Without market success, no innovation has happened!

by   -   June 26, 2013

microrobot_fingertip_xl

Unlike larger robots, microrobots for applications in the body are too small to carry batteries and motors. To address this challenge, we power and control robots made of magnetic materials using external magnetic fields. Developed at ETH Zurich’s  Multi-Scale Robotics Lab (MSRL), the OctoMag is a magnetic manipulation system that uses electromagnetic coils to wirelessly guide microrobots for ophthalmic surgery. 

by   -   May 3, 2013

How do you like to go up in a swing,
Up in the air so blue?
Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing
Ever a child can do!

Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert L. Stephenson

by   -   March 5, 2013

Rezero_motionblur

Designing robots that can function outside of controlled, factory environments isn’t easy. When those environments have people in them, they are especially unpredictable and difficult for a robot to navigate.

Enter Rezero: a compact ballbot that can fluidly drive in any direction without prior orientation.

by   -   March 5, 2013


On February 1st of this year, Catherine Mohr, Director of Medical Research and chief spokesperson for Intuitive Surgical (ISRG:NASDAQ), gave a talk on the campus of CMU. (Video of talk and Q&A).

I watched the video wherein Mohr pointed out that most of the new robotic-assisted surgical procedures, including those provided by her company’s da Vinci Surgical System, are simply improved versions of surgeries that have long been done through open or laparoscopic access — and that’s not disruptive.