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HRI

by   -   October 15, 2015

If you follow technology news — or even if you don’t — you have probably heard that numerous companies have been trying to develop driverless cars for a decade or more. These fully automated vehicles could potentially be safer than regular cars, and might add various efficiencies to our roads, like smoother-flowing traffic. Or so it is often claimed. But the promise of artificial intelligence, advanced sensors, and self-driving cars could be achieved without full autonomy, argue scholars with deep expertise in automation and technology — including David Mindell, an MIT professor and author of a new book on the subject.

by   -   September 22, 2015

roboswarm1bVirtual assistants are setting the bar for the kind of user experience people will expect from the social robots of tomorrow.

by   -   September 15, 2015

robot_cliff_edgeSocrates famously said that “the only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.” Yet while we often equate human intelligence with the ability to recognize when help is needed and where to seek it out, most robots are simply not aware enough of their own actions to assess them, let alone ask for help — resulting in task execution failures that shut down production lines, require human intervention and reduce productivity. While occasional robot failures can be tolerated, relying on humans to clean up the mess does not make for a viable business model, especially for small production batch operations or non-repetitive tasks. If robots are to be successfully deployed outside large factory settings, and into small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs), they will have to get smarter and learn to ask for help when they are stuck.

robot_policy_regulation_debate

The benefits of assistive technologies are well known – reduced inefficiencies, low costs, available 24/7 and much more. But not so well known are the appropriate legal regulations that need to be negotiated in order for much assistive technology to be put to good use. A new interdisciplinary international workshop seeks to cover this terrain, bridging the gap between two very different disciplines.

by   -   January 13, 2015

Babyloid_senior

We have a tall order when it comes to dreaming up a trustworthy care robot: a robot could clean the house, find and fetch objects, and even keep seniors company. But if robots take on so many daily care tasks for the elderly, is it possible that seniors will have to interact with them too much? Is there such a thing as a socially acceptable amount of interaction with a care robot? Let us know what you think as we continue our reader polls about care robots.

by   -   January 25, 2013

German automotive company Daimler has signed a strategic cooperation agreement with German KUKA AG, a leading systems integrator and robotics manufacturing company. The partnership focuses on human-robot cooperation to achieve optimizations both for production workers and in manufacturing processes to introduce lightweight robots, originally designed for use in outer space, in an industrial environment. 

by   -   January 9, 2013

Robot surgeons promise to save lives in remote communities, war zones, and disaster-stricken areas. A grant from the National Science Foundation will allow researchers to design the optimum workplace of the future.

by   -   January 9, 2013

Robot surgeons promise to save lives in remote communities, war zones, and disaster-stricken areas. A grant from the National Science Foundation will allow researchers to design the optimum workplace of the future.

by   -   November 20, 2012

The Japanese theater company Seinendan and Ishiguro Laboratory at Osaka University are exploring new dimensions of human-robot-interaction on stage, a new field involving a fusion of theater, arts and science.

by   -   December 23, 2011
Today’s devices are becoming smarter and connected. They sense their environment, process the data collected and act upon their decisions autonomously or semi-autonomously.  The transformation is beyond productivity and enters our daily life in health, safety, transportation, communication, entertainment, chores and more. This trend is a real opportunity for disruptive innovations.

InnoRobo – 14th to 16th of March 2012, in Lyon, France – is gathering the thinkers and doers to their innovation summit to accelerate the emergence of such innovations.
by   -   December 23, 2011


In Lyon, France, 14th to 16th March, 2012. Save the date!

By Frank Tobe, Editor/Publisher, The Robot Report (www.TheRobotReport.com)
and Catherine Simon, General Secretary, French Federation of Robotics

Today’s devices are becoming smarter and connected. They sense their environment, process the data collected and act upon their decisions autonomously or semi-autonomously.  The transformation is beyond productivity and enters our daily life in health, safety, transportation, communication, entertainment, chores and more. This trend is a real opportunity for disruptive innovations.


InnoRobo – 14th to 16th of March 2012, in Lyon, France – is gathering the thinkers and doers to their innovation summit to accelerate the emergence of such innovations.


InnoRobo promises to gather top range exhibitors from Asia, North America and Europe and will demonstrate more than 100 different robots, with 30+ displayed for the first time in Europe.  The whole emerging robotic ecosystem (creators, technologies, component suppliers, distributors, high end research labs and educational institutions) will be participating in an energetic, open-minded atmosphere, sharing and exchanging with entrepreneurs, investors, reporters and researchers.  

Of course there will be some uniquely French things that you won’t experience elsewhere:


In addition to the exhibition hall, there will be conference sessions with five major themes:


Synergies and convergence between Industrial and Service robotics:

Industrial robotics is known for its applications in welding, soldering, handling, painting and assembling, for the automotive, electronics, metal, plastic and chemical industries. But industrial robotics is evolving towards new industries as well as smaller firms. It needs to reinvent itself and produce more flexible, mobile, easily trainable robots to work hand in hand with human workers. The human robot interactions (HRI) in factories and Co-botics are hot topics demonstrating the synergies and convergence that are likely to happen between industrial and service robotics technologies and solutions.

Health and Medical robotics:

The growth of medical robots and surgeon/doctor augmentation devices since the mid-80s has been overwhelming, both as a field of innovation and research but also as a market for new products and services. Medical robotics is considered one of the success-stories of service robotics. It is a prominent segment of growth driven by demographic shifts, rising prosperity in developing countries and advances in medical technology.

Urban robots for citizens:

One vision for the future features a generation of robots designed to play various roles in urban society. Some robots will be guides, others will help the elderly, some will make sure megacities are safe and others will collect our rubbish and do various daily chores. Beyond this we envision intelligent robotics to solve our major societal challenges: mobility with an overwhelming urbanization, and sustainable development for our planet to survive our demanding energy consumption.

Cloud robotics:

Every file, document, database and digital information is now going through the “Cloud”. What does it mean for our future, with machine to machine communication, connectivity for each and every of our daily life object? The imaginary world of Matrix is not so far away: your personal robot can learn with a simple download from the Cloud how to fly a helicopter or cook the perfect dinner.

Human-Robot interactions:

User-centered design is a must for robots to truly become a mass market. Although technologies progress rapidly, and despite the impressive demonstrations of humanoid robots from Japan or elsewhere, we are not there yet.  Hence the shape of robots has to be driven both by its functions and by our human expectations.  A robotic dog which doesn’t sense my approach remains a gadget, a humanoid robot which cannot engage in a natural conversation will be a disappointment.  What is the correct level of interactions with a robot? What is the ideal form factor associated to the functions it performs? What kind of robots are we ready to accept and cooperate with in our daily life? These major questions will be dealt with by researchers, ergonomists, anthropologists and roboticists at InnoRobo.

In short, InnoRobo is all about the emerging business of service robotics, where growth is projected to be a major economic driver of the 21st century’s economy. Robotics will change our life, so it might be worth getting to know when and how. InnoRobo is a way to participate in that process.

For further information: www.innorobo.com 





3D SLAM
December 27, 2014


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