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Tag : human-robot interaction


Robohub is an online platform that brings together leading communicators in robotics research, start-ups, business, and education from around the world.
by   -   April 16, 2014

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Special thanks again to “NateFan”, whose comment inspired today’s comic.

I hope the characters referenced from NASA are good sports, I figured they’d crack up over Nate’s “findings” regarding facial expressions in near zero gravity.


by   -   March 24, 2014

Cybathlon-image

As we have been enjoying amazing scenes from Sochi, Russia where disabled athletes have been completing in the winter Paralympics, researchers in Switzerland have been considering a new route for athletes for whom normal devices such as prosthetic feet and modified wheelchairs are not suitable. For these athletes, robotic technology that can interface with the user, such as powered exoskeletons, may be better adapted to allow fair and exciting competitions.

On 8th October 2016 Zurich, Switzerland will host the Cybathlon, a championship for athletes using robotic assistive devices. Teams consisting of one or more “pilots” and a technology provider (academia or industry) will compete in one of six disciplines:


by   -   March 18, 2014

António Câmara is a man with a vision.

Despite the widespread adoption of computers and digital technology over the last few decades, how we interact with that technology, and use technology to interact with the world around us has remained largely unchanged. For example, for over 30 years, the primary means of interacting with a computer has been the keyboard and mouse. Certainly there have been updates to the technology – trackpads, for example, have become a popular mouse alternative – but that essential method of interaction remains the same. Even touch screens, perhaps the most widespread change in how people interact with technology, date back to the 1980’s.


by   -   March 13, 2014

NAO

As of yesterday, you can get the adorable and versatile humanoid robot NAO from Aldebaran Robotics for yourself, even if you are not an academic or a hardcore developer. According to Génération Robots, a European partner of Aldebaran Robotics, they are selling NAO Next Gen (that’s the fourth of the four versions of NAOs out there) with the starting price of 5628 €. In North America, the RobotsLab is offering NAO for $7990 – down from $16,000.

 


by and   -   March 11, 2014

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Timo Boll & Agilus robot Photo credit: KUKA

[UPDATE] – KUKA just published the well-advertised video of the table tennis match of top athlete Timo Boll and one of its fastest robots, the KUKA KR AGILUS. Don’t forget that even if the actual movements performed by the robot are real, the match is a directed and scripted advertisement with multiple takes (as you can see in the making of video below). It’s a very impressive presentation of the agility and speed of AGILUS, but it’s not an actual match. KUKA is celebrating with a very popular sport in China to mark the occasion of its new plant in Shanghai.

Watch the video of the match below and read more about the making of.


by   -   February 28, 2014

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I guess all those other Mars rovers just landed in the wrong spot? I had this idea yesterday to try something a little different. In the comments below, tell me, what questions would researchers want answered about Nate’s experiences on Mars? I’ll select the best and make comics out of them (showing how Nate answers) in the next few weeks, and we can find out what kind of trouble Nate gets into . . .


by   -   February 21, 2014

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The mission to Mars concludes now that Nate is back on Earth, but do you think the adventure is really over?  Learn more about Nate’s wacky life at his Website.


by   -   February 17, 2014

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Stay tuned next week for the exciting conclusion of Nate’s “mission to Mars” experience.  As always, remember you can see more at Nate’s Website.


by   -   February 13, 2014

AdrianneWortzelGuest talk in the ShanghAI Lectures, 2009-12-17

This lecture discusses the relevance of embedding dramatic scenarios and expressive language into methodologies employed in the research and development of biochemical and/or electronic sentient beings. The author demonstrates how adding imaginative modalities to current practices can afford a profound and positive effect on outcomes.


by   -   February 7, 2014

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I want to thank Robonaut for being a great sport and being willing to appear in this week’s comic!  When I got done with last week’s comic, for fun I sent a tweet to Robonaut asking him to join Nate for a little “space jam” competition, and he was all in!  The problem is, I found out that Robonaut is a little larger than I expected!!!  Check out the conversation


by   -   January 23, 2014

SukhanLeeGuest talk in the ShanghAI Lectures, 2009-12-10

Recognition has been a subject of intense research interest to computer vision, AI, cognitive science, as well as robotics communities for, at least, several decades. As a result, a rich list of research outcomes on computer based recognition and understanding of symbols, objects, faces, gestures, as well as scenes are available to date in the form of publications, open source libraries, as well as commercial products. One of the major issues in recognition, especially in 2D recognition, has been how to deal with variations due to illumination, perspective, distance, texture as well as occlusion.


by   -   January 22, 2014

On the 13th June, 1863 Samuel Butler, the English author, worried that machines might, through Darwinian Selection, develop consciousness, wrote a letter to the Editor of The Press, in Christchurch New Zealand. The letter titled Darwin among the Machines expressed Butler’s fears


by   -   January 17, 2014

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As always, remember you can see more at Nate’s Website.


by   -   January 16, 2014

AloisKnollGuest talk in the ShanghAI Lectures, 2009-12-10

The success of the human species critically depends on our extraordinary ability to engage in joint action. Our perceptions, decisions and behaviour are tuned to those of others with whom we share beliefs, intentions and goals and thus form a group. These insights underlie the motivation of the JAST project, from which this presentation shows results. One of these results was the development of a robot that is able to joint-actly work together with a human on a collaborative assembly task.





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