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Health & Medicine

by   -   December 22, 2016

Siao Tin Soh gives the low-down on the emerging demand in China for cutting edge, medical robotics, and the up-and-coming Chinese companies looking to compete in the market.

by   -   December 8, 2016

Robotics and artificial intelligence enthusiast Thosha Moodley gives a summery of her experience at European Robotics Week 2016’s central event in Amsterdam, where the theme was service robots.

by   -   November 9, 2016

Students of Delft University of Technology have developed a new add-on for a 3D printer that can cast silicones inside a 3D printed shell during the printing process. This new, and cheap, technique can be used to create new soft-robotic products that were previously impossible to make. The team presented their findings yesterday, at the science fair that marked the end of the minor Advanced Prototyping of the faculty Industrial Design Engineering.

by   -   October 26, 2016

Dr Elena De Momi discusses the motivation behind a robotic scrub nurse and next steps in her research.

by   -   October 19, 2016

Algorithms are prone to errors, biases and predictable malfunctions, writes Frank Pasquale.

by   -   October 12, 2016
Photo courtesy IATSL (Intelligent Assistive Technology and Systems Lab)  at Toronto Rehab, University of Toronto.
Occupational Therapist Rosalie Wang investigates how intelligent haptic robotic systems can benefit people recovering from upper limb disability due to stroke. Photo courtesy IATSL (Intelligent Assistive Technology and Systems Lab) at Toronto Rehab, University of Toronto.

Robotics has always been an interdisciplinary field – one that integrates knowledge from computer science, mechanical, electrical, controls, and other areas of engineering. But as robots move out of factories and research labs, and into our homes and workplaces, another breed of robotics expert is emerging – and an engineering or computer science degree is not necessarily part of their resume.

The nursing assistant for your next trip to the hospital might be a robot. This is the implication of research recently published by Dr. Elena De Momi and colleagues in the open access journal Frontiers in Robotics and AI (Artificial Intelligence).

interview by   -   September 2, 2016

putin

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Ekaterina Bereziy, Founder and CEO of ExoAtlet, about exoskeletons for the disabled and for rehabilitation.

Transcript below.

by   -   August 30, 2016
Cancer cells. Credit: CCO public domain
Cancer cells. Credit: CC0

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) software that reliably interprets mammograms, assisting doctors with a quick and accurate prediction of breast cancer risk. The AI computer software intuitively translates patient charts into diagnostic information at 30 times human speed and with 99 percent accuracy.

interview by   -   August 20, 2016

hugh_herr1

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Hugh Herr, Director of the Biomechatronics Group at MIT. Herr talks about the accident that led to the amputation of both of his legs below the knee and how this shaped his rock climbing and academic career. Herr also discusses orthoses and exoskeletons developed by his research group, as well as the future of bionic technology.

Transcript below.

by   -   August 19, 2016

Abstract electric circuit with brain technology concept- deep-learning

Scientists in Japan reportedly saved a woman’s life by applying artificial intelligence to help them diagnose a rare form of cancer. Faced with a 60-year-old woman whose cancer diagnosis was unresponsive to treatment, they supplied an AI system with huge amounts of clinical cancer case data, and it diagnosed the rare leukemia that had stumped the clinicians in just ten minutes.

The LUKE Arm in the Shoulder Configuration. (Photo: Mobius Bionics/Business Wire)
The LUKE Arm in the Shoulder Configuration. (Photo: Mobius Bionics/Business Wire)

Picture the scene: one day you wake up in a hospital with no memory of what happened and you discover in horror that your left hand is no longer there. The doctors say you’ve been in a car accident and from that moment on, you are a “trans-radial mono-lateral amputated person.”  After a slow and painful recovery from the wound, you start looking for solutions to at least partially restore the daily living functions you have lost as you’ve quickly learned that 99% of what is around us was designed to be operated by hands. There must be a way, you say to yourself, in which robotics and rehabilitation medicine can help you.

Care-o-bot
Source: Fraunhofer IPA/photo: Jens Kilian

Future Socially Assistive Robots (SARs) should be safe, but patients also have a right to privacy, liberty and social contact. The survey investigates, in a hypothetical scenario, how Annie’s SAR should prioritise tasks, asking to indicate in how far Annie’s privacy and autonomy can be violated in the interest of her well-being. The survey is designed to investigate how variable people’s opinions are and to understand whether respondents agree on a set of behavioural rules in this hypothetical scenario.

by   -   August 5, 2016
Maj. (Dr.) George Kallingal showcases a robotic surgical system while Lt. Col. (Dr.) Thomas Novak, Brooke Army Medical Center's chief of pediatric urology, looks on at San Antonio Military Medical Center in San Antonio.  Photo credit: Robert Shields
Maj. (Dr.) George Kallingal showcases a robotic surgical system while Lt. Col. (Dr.) Thomas Novak, Brooke Army Medical Center’s chief of pediatric urology, looks on at San Antonio Military Medical Center in San Antonio. Photo credit: Robert Shields

Robotic surgery has long been dominated by Intuitive Surgical which has placed more than 3,600 of its da Vinci machines in hospitals around the world. Nevertheless, an increasing number of new players are entering the marketplace.

by   -   August 2, 2016
By rotating the magnetic field at a certain frequency the robotic chains will split into separate, individually controllable robots. Credit: Drexel University/YouTube
By rotating the magnetic field at a certain frequency the robotic chains will split into separate, individually controllable robots.
Credit: Drexel University/YouTube

Drexel University researchers, led by MinJun Kim, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering, have successfully pulled off a feat that both sci-fi fans and Michael Phelps could appreciate. Using a rotating magnetic field they show how multiple chains of microscopic magnetic bead-based robots can link up to reach impressive speeds swimming through in a microfluidic environment. Their finding is the latest step toward using the so-called “microswimmers” to deliver medicine and perform surgery inside the body.

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