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Mathieu Bélanger-Barrette


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Mathieu works as the production engineer at Robotiq, where he strives to constantly optimize the production line for Robotiq Grippers. Mathieu is always looking for new manufacturing processes to make operators as efficient as possible. He is also seeking out new robotic applications and their effect on improving our world, then keeps Robotiq’s blog readers updated on his finds.



FRANKA EMIKA can be operated and programmed by anyone, regardless of technical skill, in just a few minutes through a visually intuitive setup process.

Source: Smart & Digital Factory Application Lab van Sirris in Kortrijk
Source: Smart & Digital Factory Application Lab van Sirris in Kortrijk

We often see robotic or automated cells purposed to do a single motion or a very specific application. However, with all the new technology available in the market, it is interesting to see how each separate technology can be integrated into a single versatile cell. This is what Sirris did and it is quite impressive.  

Payload, grip force, weight, reach are all data that are used to describe and differentiate robots from each other. Payload is mostly used to determine the weight that the robot can carry through space. However, in order to enhance your robot program, you may want to fine tune your robot payload. Here’s why.

Robotiq_Force_SensingFor many years, industrial robots were not able to monitor their surroundings. With the introduction of different sensors for robots, they are now able to feel what they are handling and see what they are doing or who is around them. However, force sensing is still less popular than vision systems, even though it can be as useful as vision, and in some instances more so. Here’s why you should use force feedback in your robotic applications. 

Robot-arm-factory_manufacturing_industrialIf you haven’t already introduced a robot into your workshop, or if you are in the process of introducing such a device, you may be wondering … what is the best place to start? What is easy and what is hard to automate? Perhaps there are hundreds — or even thousands — of applications in your workshop. What should be automated first? Here is how we evaluate an application. 

TM-Robotics

Anyone who has been in robotics long enough is eventually tasked with figuring out how many axes they will need for their robot. Most robots have somewhere between three and seven axes, but how do you determine how many you actually need? Here’s a recap of the different types of robots you are likely to encounter, classified by their number of axes (or degrees of freedom).