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Mark Stephen Meadows


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Mark Stephen Meadows is President of BOTanic, a company that provides natural language interfaces for conversational avatars, robots, IoT appliances, and connected systems. He is the author of “We Robot,” “I Avatar,” and other books. Mark Stephen Meadows is an author, inventor and designer. With more than two decades' experience in virtual reality and artificial intelligence he began working with robotics and natural language interface in 2009. He is the author of "We, Robot” and other books that examine media, technology, and their cultural impact. He is also the author of six patents in related fields. Helping to build the third dot-com webserver (well.com, in 1993) Meadows went on to found his first company, Construct, in 1995. In the following years Meadows worked at Xerox-PARC, Stanford Research Institute, the Waag (among other research centers), government associations in Holland and Australia, and traveled extensively lecturing on this work. He is the President of BOTanic (formerly Geppetto Labs), which he founded in 2012. He lives in San Francisco on his sailboat.



This article discusses how body language is a part of natural language, personality, and NLP design. The article covers various methods for approaching this problem and makes recommendations for the real-time generation of animation to accompany natural language for avatars and robots.

It’s hard to communicate with words. Some researchers claim that almost half of our communication relies on things that aren’t words: body language, tone of voice, and stuff that just isn’t conveyed by text. This includes prosody (tone, pitch and speed of words), facial expression, hand gesture, stance and posture. This probably explains why about 40% of emails are misunderstood.  

by   -   July 3, 2013

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This article considers privacy in robotic systems (such as personal service robotics) as being of greater importance than privacy in telecommunications (such as Internet). We will return to our regularly scheduled program – about gestures and body language – next month.

Let’s say a white box showed up on your doorstep and you open it up and find a little humanoid robot made by Google. A GoogleBot! The brightly-colored pamphlet says that the little disk of a device will vacuum your floor, all for the same cost as your Gmail account: free.

by   -   June 5, 2013

This article discusses personality design and how proper natural language interface design includes body language.  The article is about the design of hearts and minds for robots. It argues that psychology must be graphically represented, that body language is a means to do that, and points out why this is kind of funny.

Comrades, we live in a bleak and humourless world.  Here we are thirteen years into the twenty-first century, and we all carry around Star Trek style tri-corders, we have access to almost all human opinions via this awesome global computer network, we have thousands and thousands of channels we can flip through on television, we have something like 48,000 people signed up to go colonize Mars, and we even have robots roaming around up there, taking samples of that planet. But we still don’t have robots that can tell a good joke.

by   -   May 4, 2013

This article outlines the problems of today’s phone and online help systems and offers solutions to conversational systems of tomorrow. The article is about the design of hearts and minds for robots, considers the virtual voice as a legitimate robot, and takes a fast pass at the psychology of robot-human interaction.

by   -   April 3, 2013

This article looks at how the robotics industry of today is following in the footsteps of the personal computer industry of yesterday, and why Natural Language Processing, like the Graphical User Interface, plays a key role in this industry-wide evolution.

by   -   March 6, 2013

This article looks at the arrival of systems such as Siri, Google Now, and Watson and claims that these systems are the search engines of the next decade because they mine intimate data.  Since they integrate search they will replace search, as well as a host of other interface and information retrieval functions.  This offers an outline to both the personal benefits and privacy risks.