Robohub.org
 

Adaptive walking using oscillators

by
10 November 2010



share this:

Animal walking is thought to be driven by rhythmic signals sent through the spinal cord. These signals are translated to motions of the limbs. For a bipedal walker, such patterns would force leg swings and foot contacts to be alternated so as to achieve stable walking. By using similar mechanisms, roboticists hope to generate walking gates that do not require any complex modeling or computation.

Along these lines, Aoi et al. consider stable walking with a five-link biped robot. The links represent the femur and tibia of both legs and torso as shown in the video below. The robot is driven by a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) that uses one oscillator to generate the rhythmic signals. As a first step, they investigate what parameters lead to stable walking when no sensory feedback is used (open-loop). Important parameters include walking speed, knee amplitude, and distribution of mass. In a second step, the robot is able to detect when its foot hits the ground and use that information to reset the oscillator. By reacting to its environment, the robot is therefor able to adapt its walking and achieve better stability. Finally, controller parameters for the walker are optimized to fully exploit the interactions between robot dynamics, oscillator dynamics and the environment.




Sabine Hauert is President of Robohub and Associate Professor at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory
Sabine Hauert is President of Robohub and Associate Professor at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory





Related posts :



Flocks of assembler robots show potential for making larger structures

Researchers make progress toward groups of robots that could build almost anything, including buildings, vehicles, and even bigger robots.
25 November 2022, by

Holiday robot wishlist for/from Women in Robotics

Are you looking for a gift for the women in robotics in your life? Or the up and coming women in robotics in your family? Perhaps these suggestions from our not-for-profit Women in Robotics organization will inspire!
24 November 2022, by and

TRINITY, the European network for Agile Manufacturing

The Trinity project is the magnet that connects every segment of agile with everyone involved, creating a network that supports people, organisations, production and processes.
20 November 2022, by

Fighting tumours with magnetic bacteria

Researchers at ETH Zurich are planning to use magnetic bacteria to fight cancerous tumours. They have now found a way for these microorganisms to effectively cross blood vessel walls and subsequently colonise a tumour.
19 November 2022, by

Combating climate change with a soft robotics fish

We have fabricated a 3D printed, cable-actuated wave spring tail made from soft materials that can drive a small robot fish.
17 November 2022, by

#IROS2022 best paper awards

Here we bring you the papers that received an award this year at IROS in case you missed them.
14 November 2022, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association