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Harvard University         


interview by   -   May 20, 2020

In this episode, Kate Zhou interviews Farrell Helbling, postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Microrobotics lab, who has worked on developing the RoboBee, an insect-inspired robot that is the lightest vehicle to achieve untethered flight. Farrell discusses challenges with building the robot at centimeter-scale as well as integration of sensors and power electronics particularly in considerations with weight trade-offs.

by   -   May 15, 2020

Online Mini-Symposium Tuesday May 19 2020 9:30-1:30 PT – free and open to the public

by   -   May 12, 2020

Robotics Today Seminar May 15: Andrew Davison, Imperial College London

Interactive Perception and Robot Learning Lab         


interview by   -   May 11, 2020

In this episode, Lilly Clark interviews Jeannette Bohg, Assistant Professor at Stanford, about her work in interactive perception and robot learning for grasping and manipulation tasks. Bohg discusses how robots and humans are different, the challenge of high dimensional data, and unsolved problems including continuous learning and decentralized manipulation.

by   -   May 10, 2020

Welcome to the voting for the Audience Choice Demo from HRI 2020 (voting closed on May 14 11:59PM BST). Each of these demos showcases an aspect of Human-Robot Interaction research, and alongside “Best Demo” award, we’re offering an “Audience Choice” award. You can see the video and abstract from each demo here. You can also register for the Online HRI 2020 Demo Discussion and Award Presentation on May 21 4:00 PM BST.

by   -   May 6, 2020


By Peter Dizikes

This is part 3 of a three-part series examining the effects of robots and automation on employment, based on new research from economist and Institute Professor Daron Acemoglu. 

by   -   May 6, 2020
A new study co-authored by an MIT professor shows firms that move quickly to use robots tend to add workers to their payroll, while industry job losses are more concentrated in firms that make this change more slowly.
Image: Stock photo

This is part 2 of a three-part series examining the effects of robots and automation on employment, based on new research from economist and Institute Professor Daron Acemoglu. 

by   -   May 6, 2020

MIT professor Daron Acemoglu is co-author of a new study showing that each robot added to the workforce has the effect of replacing 3.3 jobs across the U.S.
Image: Stock image edited by MIT News
By Peter Dizikes

This is part 1 of a three-part series examining the effects of robots and automation on employment, based on new research from economist and Institute Professor Daron Acemoglu.  

by   -   May 6, 2020

By Benjamin Eysenbach and Abhishek Gupta

This post is cross-listed on the CMU ML blog.

The history of machine learning has largely been a story of increasing abstraction. In the dawn of ML, researchers spent considerable effort engineering features. As deep learning gained popularity, researchers then shifted towards tuning the update rules and learning rates for their optimizers. Recent research in meta-learning has climbed one level of abstraction higher: many researchers now spend their days manually constructing task distributions, from which they can automatically learn good optimizers. What might be the next rung on this ladder? In this post we introduce theory and algorithms for unsupervised meta-learning, where machine learning algorithms themselves propose their own task distributions. Unsupervised meta-learning further reduces the amount of human supervision required to solve tasks, potentially inserting a new rung on this ladder of abstraction.

interview by   -   April 28, 2020

In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks with Janet Vertessi, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Princeton, on her book Seeing Like a Rover: How Robots, Teams, and Images Craft Knowledge of Mars. The book is written about her experience living and working with NASA’s Mars Rover team, and includes her observations about the team’s leadership and their relationship with their robot millions of miles away on Mars. She also gives some advice from her findings for teams.

by   -   April 27, 2020

Looking at the Open Source COVID-19 Medical Supplies production tally of handcrafted masks and faceshields, we’re trying to answer that question in our weekly discussions about ‘COVID-19, robots and us’. We talked to  Rachel ‘McCrafty’ Sadd has been building systems and automation for COVID mask making, as the founder of Project Mask Making and #distillmyheart projects in the SF Bay Area, an artist and also as Executive Director of Ace Monster Toys makerspace/studio. Rachel has been organizing volunteers and automating workflows to get 1700 cloth masks hand sewn and distributed to people at risk before the end of April. “Where’s my f*king robot!” was the theme of her short presentation.

by   -   April 20, 2020

Health care workers are not the only unwilling essential services frontline workers at increased risk of COVID-19. According to the Washington Post on April 12, “At least 41 grocery workers have died of the coronavirus and thousands more have tested positive in recent weeks”. At the same time, grocery stores are seeing a surge in demand and are currently hiring. The food industry is also seeing increasing adoption of robots in both the back end supply chain and in the food retail and food service sectors.

by   -   April 18, 2020

Community, Art and the Vernacular in Technological Ecosystems

by   -   April 17, 2020

COVID-19, robots and us – weekly discussion from March 31 2020

interview by   -   April 13, 2020

In this episode, Lilly interviews Kajal Gada on her work at BrainCorp, the San Diego-based company behind BrainOS, a technology stack for autonomous solutions. Kajal discusses BrainCorp’s cloud-connected operating system and their floor cleaning, vacuuming, and warehouse delivery robots. She also articulates some of the challenges in becoming a software engineer and developing commercial solutions.

RoboBee’s Untethered Flight
May 20, 2020

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