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by and   -   September 21, 2021

Growing Clearpath with Open Source Software

by   -   September 21, 2021

A student team in RoboHouse has invented a robot that may enable more precise treatment of prostate cancer. The team collaborated with Martijn de Vries, a PhD researcher at TU Delft specialised in developing minimally invasive instruments for tumor treatment.

Apart from the IEEE/RSJ IROS 2020 (International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems) original series Real Roboticist that we have been featuring in the last weeks, another series of three videos was produced together with Black in Robotics and the support of Toyota Research Institute. In this series, black roboticists give their personal examples of why diversity matters in robotics, showcase their research and explain what made them build a career in robotics.

by   -   September 9, 2021

On August 8th, 2021, a team of four graduate students from the University of Toronto presented their ethical design in the world’s first ever roboethics competition, the RO-MAN 2021 Roboethics to Design & Development Competition. During the competition, design teams tackled a challenging yet relatable scenario—introducing a robot helper to the household. The students’ solution, entitled ”Jeeves, the Ethically Designed Interface (JEDI)”, demonstrated how home robots can act safely and according to social and cultural norms. Judges from around the world, with diverse backgrounds ranging from industry professionals to lawyers and professors in ethics, gave their feedback on the team’s submission. Open Roboethics Institute also hosted an online opinion poll to hear what the general public thinks about the solution for this challenge.

Author: Andrea Facco. Credits: Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia – © IIT, all rights reserved

Gaze is an extremely powerful and important signal during human-human communication and interaction, conveying intentions and informing about other’s decisions. What happens when a robot and a human interact looking at each other? Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) investigated whether a humanoid robot’s gaze influences the way people reason in a social decision-making context. What they found is that a mutual gaze with a robot affects human neural activity, influencing decision-making processes, in particular delaying them. Thus, a robot gaze brings humans to perceive it as a social signal. These findings have strong implications for contexts where humanoids may find applications such as co-workers, clinical support or domestic assistants.

by   -   September 3, 2021

In February we asked ‘How can robotics help Rob, the gas leak detector?’, when announcing our collaboration with Alliander about cognitive robotics and worker wellbeing. Today, we are able to share some tentative insights.

During the last decades robots are transforming from simple machines to cognitive collaborators. The distance that has been covered is long, but there are still challenges, as well as opportunities that lie ahead. That was also the main topic of discussion in the agROBOfood event ‘Visioning the future of agri-food robotics’ by a panel of experts of the domain.

The IEEE Robotics and Automation Society has recently released the list of winners of their best paper awards. Below you can see the list and access the publications. Congratulations to all winners!

Segmented hinges in the long, thin bones of fish fins are critical to the incredible mechanical properties of fins, and this design could inspire improved underwater propulsion systems, new robotic materials and even new aircraft designs.

The C-Rob Autonomous Mobile Robots | Image credit: NTUH Facebook Page

ADATA Technology has collaborated with researchers at Hsinchu National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH) to introduce the C-Rob Autonomous Mobile Robots. These robots use Artificial Intelligence (AI) to reduce the workload of healthcare workers as Taiwan continues to combat the Covid-19 pandemic.

Thanks to their swimming robot modeled after a lamprey, EPFL scientists may have discovered why some vertebrates are able to retain their locomotor capabilities after a spinal cord lesion. The finding could also help improve the performance of swimming robots used for search and rescue missions and for environmental monitoring.

by   -   August 10, 2021

So what does it mean for a robot to act ethically within a home environment? Researchers have been thinking about this question from different perspectives for the past couple of decades. Some look at the question from a labor perspective while others focus on the technology’s impact on different stakeholders. Inspired by these lines of work, we are interested in further understanding your (the public’s) perspective on one team’s proposed solution for a service robot ethical challenge.

Tree squirrels are the Olympic divers of the rodent world, leaping gracefully among branches and structures high above the ground. In a newly published study, we show that squirrels leap and land without falling by making trade-offs between the distance they have to cover and the springiness of their takeoff perch. This research provides new insights into the roles of decision-making, learning and behavior in challenging environments that we are sharing with researchers of human movement and with engineers.

Robot mobility is booming worldwide: Unit sales of Autonomous Mobile Robots (AMRs) in the logistics sector e.g. will increase by 31% between 2020 and 2023 annually. At the same time, the use of AMRs in public environments will also go up rapidly – IFR predicts unit sales will grow by 40% per year worldwide.

In the young discipline of robotics-inspired biology, robots replace experimental animals, allowing researchers to learn about animals under a wider range of conditions than exist in nature or the laboratory. What is the secret behind the steady but oh-so-elegant way in which cats move? That’s the subject of a study in Frontiers in Neurorobotics by scientists from Osaka University, who built a novel, 47cm-long and 7.6kg-heavy robotic cat.



Marsupial Robots
September 14, 2021


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