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by   -   November 10, 2018

In February we asked for input from the robotics community regarding a potential Robotics Flagship, a pan European interdisciplinary effort with 1B EUR in funding, if successful! The goal of the flagship is to drive the development of future robots and AIs that are ethically, socially, economically, energetically, and environmentally responsible and sustainable.

by   -   November 9, 2018


In this episode of Robots in Depth, Per Sjöborg speaks with Richard Voyles about rescue robotics and advising politicians about robotics.

by   -   November 4, 2018
ANYmal

A crucial task for energy providers is the reliable and safe operation of their plants, especially when producing energy offshore. Autonomous mobile robots are able to offer comprehensive support through regular and automated inspection of machinery and infrastructure. In a world’s first pilot installation, transmission system operator TenneT tested the autonomous legged robot ANYmal on one of the world’s largest offshore converter platforms in the North Sea.

by   -   November 4, 2018

MIT researchers describe an autonomous system for a fleet of drones to collaboratively search under dense forest canopies using only onboard computation and wireless communication — no GPS required.
Images: Melanie Gonick

By Rob Matheson

Finding lost hikers in forests can be a difficult and lengthy process, as helicopters and drones can’t get a glimpse through the thick tree canopy. Recently, it’s been proposed that autonomous drones, which can bob and weave through trees, could aid these searches. But the GPS signals used to guide the aircraft can be unreliable or nonexistent in forest environments.

by   -   November 4, 2018

MIT researchers have developed a “semantic parser” that learns through observation to more closely mimic a child’s language-acquisition process, which could greatly extend computing’s capabilities.
Photo: MIT News

By Rob Matheson

Children learn language by observing their environment, listening to the people around them, and connecting the dots between what they see and hear. Among other things, this helps children establish their language’s word order, such as where subjects and verbs fall in a sentence.

by   -   November 4, 2018

In this episode of Robots in Depth, Per Sjöborg speaks with Stefano Stramigioli about the Robotics and Mechatronics lab he leads at University of Twente. The lab focuses on inspection and maintenance robotics, as well as medical applications.

by   -   November 4, 2018


Researchers from EPFL and Stanford have developed small drones that can land and then move objects that are 40 times their weight, with the help of powerful winches, gecko adhesives and microspines.

by   -   October 30, 2018
Credit: Fraunhofer IPA

As part of the “SeRoDi” project (“Service Robotics for Personal Services”), Fraunhofer IPA collaborated with other research and application partners to develop new service robotics solutions for the nursing sector. The resulting robots, the “intelligent care cart” and the “robotic service assistant”, were used in extensive real-world trials in a hospital and at two care homes.

by   -   October 24, 2018

By Daniel Seita, Jeff Mahler, Mike Danielczuk, Matthew Matl, and Ken Goldberg

This post explores two independent innovations and the potential for combining them in robotics. Two years before the AlexNet results on ImageNet were released in 2012, Microsoft rolled out the Kinect for the X-Box. This class of low-cost depth sensors emerged just as Deep Learning boosted Artificial Intelligence by accelerating performance of hyper-parametric function approximators leading to surprising advances in image classification, speech recognition, and language translation.

by   -   October 24, 2018


In this episode of Robots in Depth, Per Sjöborg speaks Sebastian Weisenburger about how ECHORD++ works, with application-oriented research bridging academia, industry and end users to bring robots to market, under the banner “From lab to market”.

by   -   October 24, 2018

This photo shows circles on a graphene sheet where the sheet is draped over an array of round posts, creating stresses that will cause these discs to separate from the sheet. The gray bar across the sheet is liquid being used to lift the discs from the surface.
Image: Felice Frankel

By David L. Chandler

Tiny robots no bigger than a cell could be mass-produced using a new method developed by researchers at MIT. The microscopic devices, which the team calls “syncells” (short for synthetic cells), might eventually be used to monitor conditions inside an oil or gas pipeline, or to search out disease while floating through the bloodstream.

by   -   October 24, 2018

Ethical questions involving autonomous vehicles are the focus of a new global survey conducted by MIT researchers.

By Peter Dizikes

A massive new survey developed by MIT researchers reveals some distinct global preferences concerning the ethics of autonomous vehicles, as well as some regional variations in those preferences.

by   -   October 20, 2018

World MoveIt! Day is an international hackathon to improve the MoveIt! code base, documentation, and community. We hope to close as many pull requests and issues as possible and explore new areas of features and improvements for the now seven year old framework. Everyone is welcome to participate from their local workplace, simply by working on open issues. In addition, a number of companies and groups host meetings on their sites all over the world. A video feed will unite the various locations and enable more collaboration. Maintainers will take part in some of these locations.

 

Locations

  • Note that the Tokyo and Singapore locations will have their events on Friday the 26th, not Thursday the 25th.

General Information Contacts

  • Dave Coleman, Nathan Brooks, Rob Coleman // PickNik Consulting

Signup

Please state your intent to join the event on this form. Note that specific locations will have their own signups in addition to this form.

If you aren’t near an organized event we encourage you to have your own event in your lab/organization/company and video conference in to all the other events. We would also like to mail your team or event some MoveIt! stickers to schwag out your robots!

Logistics

What version of MoveIt! should you use?

We recommend the Kinetic LTS branch/release. The Melodic release is also a good choice but is new and has been tested less. The Indigo branch is considered stable and frozen – and only critical bug fixes will be backported.

For your convenience, a VirtualBox image for ROS Kinetic on Ubuntu 16.04 is available here.

Finding Where You Can Help

Suggested areas for improvement are tracked on MoveIt’s GitHub repo via several labels:

  • moveit day candidate labels issues as possible entry points for participants in the event. This list will grow longer before the event.
  • simple improvements indicates the issue can probably be tackled in a few hours, depending on your background.
  • documentation suggests new tutorials, changes to the website, etc.
  • assigned aids developers to find issues that are not already being worked on.
  • no label – of course issues that are not marked can still be worked on during World MoveIt! day, though they will likely take longer than one day to complete.

If you would like to help the MoveIt! project by tackling an issue, claim the issue by commenting “I’ll work on this” and a maintainer will add the label “assigned”. Feel free to ask further questions in each issue’s comments. The developers will aim to reply to WMD-related questions before the event begins.

If you have ideas and improvements for the project, please add your own issues to the tracker, using the appropriate labels where applicable. It’s fine if you want to then claim them for yourself.

Further needs for documentation and tutorials improvement can be found directly on the moveit_tutorials issue tracker.

Other larger code sprint ideas can be found on this page. While they will take longer than a day the ideas might provide a good reference for other things to contribute on WMD.

Documentation

Improving our documentation is at least as important as fixing bugs in the system. Please add to our Sphinx and Markdown-based documentation within our packages and on the MoveIt! website. If you have studied extensively an aspect of MoveIt! that is not currently documented well, please convert your notes into a pull request in the appropriate location. If you’ve started a conversation on the mailing list or other location where a more experienced developer explained a concept, consider converting that answer into a pull request to help others in the future with the same question.

For more details on modifying documentation, see Contributing.

Video Conference and IRC

Join the conversation on IRC with #moveit at irc.freenode.net. For those new to IRC try this web client.

Joint the video conference on Appear.In

Sponsorship

We’d like to thank the following sponsors:

PickNik Consulting

Iron Ox

Fraunhofer IPA

ROS-Industrial Asian Pacific Consortium

Tokyo Opensource Robotics Kyokai Association

OMRON SINIC X Corporation

Southwest Research Institute

by   -   October 19, 2018

In this episode of Robots in Depth, Per Sjöborg speaks with Nicola Tomatis about his long road into robotics and how BlueBotics handles indoor navigation and integrates it in automated guided vehicles (AGV).

by   -   October 19, 2018

Researchers are using computer simulations to estimate how 11 different species of extinct archosaurs such as the batrachotomus might have moved. Image credit: John Hutchinson

By Sandrine Ceurstemont

From about 245 to 66 million years ago, dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Although well-preserved skeletons give us a good idea of what they looked like, the way their limbs worked remains a bigger mystery. But computer simulations may soon provide a realistic glimpse into how some species moved and inform work in fields such as robotics, prosthetics and architecture.



Presented work at IROS 2018 (Part 1 of 3)
November 12, 2018


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