Robohub.org
 

Chameleon robot changes color depending on surroundings

by
17 August 2012



share this:

A robot that can change colour to either blend in with or stand out from its surroundings has been created by researchers at Harvard University. It was inspired by the camouflage skills found in many sea creatures including octopuses, cuttlefish, and squid.

In a study published in the journal Science the researchers show how simple microfluidic networks allow to change the color, contrast, pattern, apparent shape, luminescence, and surface temperature of soft robots made from polymers and flexible reinforcing sheets. For now, the colored solutions injected into the microfluidic networks were all prepared manually. The color of these networks can be changed simultaneously in the visible and infrared — a capability that biological organisms do not have. These strategies begin to imitate the functions, although not the anatomies, of color-changing animals.

Some photos:

The robot on man-made background. See if you can spot all five robots in panel F.

The robot on natural background:

The micro-fluidic networks developed by the researchers:




Markus Waibel is a Co-Founder and COO of Verity Studios AG, Co-Founder of Robohub and the ROBOTS Podcast.
Markus Waibel is a Co-Founder and COO of Verity Studios AG, Co-Founder of Robohub and the ROBOTS Podcast.





Related posts :



Robot Talk Episode 86 – Mario Di Castro

In the latest episode of the Robot Talk podcast, Claire chatted to Mario Di Castro from CERN all about robotic inspection and maintenance in hazardous environments.
24 May 2024, by

Congratulations to the #ICRA2024 best paper winners

The winners and finalists in the different categories have been announced.
20 May 2024, by

Robot Talk Episode 85 – Margarita Chli

In the latest episode of the Robot Talk podcast, Claire chatted to Margarita Chli from the University of Cyprus all about vision, navigation, and small aerial drones.
17 May 2024, by

What’s coming up at #ICRA2024?

Find out what's on the programme at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation.
10 May 2024, by

Octopus inspires new suction mechanism for robots

Suction cup grasping a stone - Image credit: Tianqi Yue The team, based at Bristol Robotics Laboratory, studied the structures of octopus biological suckers,  which have superb adaptive s...
18 April 2024, by

Open Robotics Launches the Open Source Robotics Alliance

The Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF) is pleased to announce the creation of the Open Source Robotics Alliance (OSRA), a new initiative to strengthen the governance of our open-source robotics so...





Robohub is supported by:




Would you like to learn how to tell impactful stories about your robot or AI system?


scicomm
training the next generation of science communicators in robotics & AI


©2024 - Association for the Understanding of Artificial Intelligence


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association