Robohub.org
 

Drones against illegal fishing

by
24 July 2014



share this:
illegal_fishing
Image source: Flickr

With industry losses worth US$23 billion per year, illegal fishing represents a major global problem. One out of three bluefin tunas are caught illegally, as are around 20% of all fish hauled around the world. Even the legal fishing industry, with its compliance to maritime wildlife protection standards, has the capacity to damage fragile maritime ecosystems. Illegal fishing can completely destroy them.

Efforts are being made on a global scale to tackle this problem, however the challenge has persisted due to the substantial number of time, people, boats and aircraft typically required to patrol large stretches of coastline. But unmanned aircraft patrols are proving to be a viable solution.

One of the countries hardest hit by illegal fishing is Belize, a small coastal country in Central America. It was so rampant that in March of this year the European Union suspended all seafood imports from Belize (as well as from Cambodia and Guinea, for the same reason).

Help comes from ConservationDrones.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to building and using UAVs for conservation-related applications, and sharing their knowledge with conservation workers and researchers worldwide, especially those in developing countries. Belize Fisheries Department officials are now being trained to use drones to monitor fishing areas, following a test phase that started in July 2013.

The fixed wing drones that are being used for this project can fly for over an hour, have a range of 50km and are capable of capturing high-definition photos and videos. They will be used to patrol difficult to reach areas, such as coastal mangrove forests, at a fraction of the cost of a conventional, manned aircraft. Once the illegal activity is located, authorities can dispatch a vessel and perform a seagoing search much more efficiently.

It will be interesting to see the effects of these new tactics against “pirate” fishing practice, and how soon Belize will begin to reap the benefits – specifically the lifting of the EU’s seafood import ban.

On a side note, drones provided by ConservationDrones.org should provide a much-needed, low-cost solution for the protection of one of the world’s most famous coral reefs, Glover’s Reef.

For further reading, see this post by the Founding Director of Conservation Drones Lian Pin Koh, check out his TED Talk, or see these articles on Gizmag, National Geographic and the New York Times.

Video courtesy of ConservationDrones.org



tags: , , , , , ,


Dronologista Aviation & Drone Enthusiast
Dronologista Aviation & Drone Enthusiast





Related posts :



At the forefront of building with biology

Raman is, as she puts it, “a mechanical engineer through and through.” Today, Ritu Raman leads the Raman Lab and is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.
28 June 2022, by

Hot Robotics Symposium celebrates UK success

An internationally leading robotics initiative that enables academia and industry to find innovative solutions to real world challenges, celebrated its success with a Hot Robotics Symposium hosted across three UK regions last week.
25 June 2022, by

Researchers release open-source photorealistic simulator for autonomous driving

MIT scientists unveil the first open-source simulation engine capable of constructing realistic environments for deployable training and testing of autonomous vehicles.
22 June 2022, by

In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks to Maria Telleria, who is a co-founder and the CTO of Canvas. Canvas makes a drywall finishing robot and is based in the Bay Area. In this interview, Maria talks ab...
21 June 2022, by and

Coffee with a Researcher (#ICRA2022)

As part of her role as one of the IEEE ICRA 2022 Science Communication Awardees, Avie Ravendran sat down virtually with a few researchers from academia and industry attending the conference.

Seeing the robots at #ICRA2022 through the eyes of a robot

Accessbility@ICRA2022 and OhmniLabs provided three OhmniBots for the conference, allowing students, faculty and interested industry members to attend the expo and poster sessions.
17 June 2022, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association