Robohub.org
 

Two New Year’s resolutions for developers of automated vehicles

by
12 January 2016



share this:

self_driving_Robocar_autonomous_car_spedometer_accelerate_needle_speedIn the spirit of the New Year, and especially in the wake of California’s draft rules for the (theoretical) operation of automated motor vehicles, I offer two resolutions for any serious developer of an automated driving (or flying) system.

Such a developer should:

1) Detail the specific changes to existing law, if any, that the developer needs in order to deploy its system in each jurisdiction of interest. Serious developers should already be conducting legal research and development commensurate with their technical research and development; sharing their legal conclusions (rather than merely making generalized statements about the need for uniformity or clarity) will complement the comprehensive legal audits that I have urged governments to conduct.

2) Make what I call a “public safety case” that candidly explains how the developer (a) defines reasonable safety, (b) will satisfy itself that its sytem is reasonably safe, and (c) will continue to do so over the lifetime of the system. This public safety case will be crucial to appropriately managing public expectations in both directions, to easing the concerns of regulators who are understandably wary about asserting the safety of novel systems, and to establishing norms against which amateur efforts at automation might be measured.

In many cases, an automated system may not be mature enough for its developer to understand the specific legal implications or to articulate a specific safety philosophy. If so, that is also a valuable message. As automated systems become more visible on public roads (and in public airspace), their developers should step more fully into the broader public sphere.



tags: , , , ,


Bryant Walker Smith is an expert on the legal aspects of autonomous driving and a fellow at Stanford Law School.
Bryant Walker Smith is an expert on the legal aspects of autonomous driving and a fellow at Stanford Law School.





Related posts :



Women in Tech leadership resources from IMTS 2022

There’ve been quite a few events recently focusing on Women in Robotics, Women in Manufacturing, Women in 3D Printing, in Engineering, and in Tech Leadership. One of the largest tradeshows in the US is IMTS 2022. Here I bring you some resources shared in the curated technical content and leadership sessions.
29 September 2022, by and

MIT engineers build a battery-free, wireless underwater camera

The device could help scientists explore unknown regions of the ocean, track pollution, or monitor the effects of climate change.
27 September 2022, by

How do we control robots on the moon?

In the future, we imagine that teams of robots will explore and develop the surface of nearby planets, moons and asteroids - taking samples, building structures, deploying instruments.
25 September 2022, by , and

Have a say on these robotics solutions before they enter the market!

We have gathered robots which are being developed right now or have just entered the market. We have set these up in a survey style consultation.
24 September 2022, by

Shelf-stocking robots with independent movement

A robot that helps store employees by moving independently through the supermarket and shelving products. According to cognitive robotics researcher Carlos Hernández Corbato, this may be possible in the future. If we engineer the unexpected.
23 September 2022, by

RoboCup humanoid league: Interview with Jasper Güldenstein

We talked to Jasper Güldenstein about how teams transferred developments from the virtual humanoid league to the real-world league.
20 September 2022, by and





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association