Robohub.org
 

Roadmap for creating Singooglarity?

by
23 January 2013



share this:

Ray Kurzweil, one of the world’s leading inventors, thinkers, and futurists, announced in December 2012 that he will be joining Google as Director of Engineering to work on new projects involving machine learning and language processing.

Credit: Ray Kurzweil/Viking Press

Creating Singooglarity 
Visionary and transhumanist Kurzweil has published several bestseller books such as The Singularity Is Near and Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever, that may serve as roadmaps for creating new super-intelligent Google services.
In his latest 352-page book, How to Create a Mind, he explores how artificial intelligence can enrich and expand human capabilities.

From the book:

Kurzweil discusses how the brain functions, how the mind emerges from the brain, and the implications of vastly increasing the powers of our intelligence in addressing the world’s problems. He thoughtfully examines emotional and moral intelligence and the origins of consciousness and envisions the radical possibilities of our merging with the intelligent technology we are creating. Drawing on the most recent neuroscience research, his own research and inventions in artificial intelligence, and compelling thought experiments, he describes his new theory of how the neocortex (the thinking part of the brain) works: as a self-organizing hierarchical system of pattern recognizers. Kurzweil describes how these insights will enable us to greatly extend the powers of our own mind and provides a roadmap for the creation of superintelligence—humankind’s most exciting next venture. In Kurzweil´s vision we are now at the dawn of an era of radical possibilities in which merging with our technology will enable us to effectively address the world’s grand challenges.

Kurzweil’s ideas have been controversial before and generated criticism within the scientific community and in the media, including Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, cognitive scientist Douglas Hofstadter and biologist P. Z. Myers. Also his new book has drawn criticism i.e. from Gary Marcus, a professor of psychology at N.Y.U.



tags:


Wolfgang Heller





Related posts :



Meet the Oystamaran

Working directly with oyster farmers, MIT students are developing a robot that can flip heavy, floating bags of oysters, helping the shellfish to grow and stay healthy.
08 December 2021, by

Exploring ROS2 with a wheeled robot – #4 – Obstacle avoidance

In this post you’ll learn how to program a robot to avoid obstacles using ROS2 and C++. Up to the end of the post, the Dolly robot moves autonomously in a scene with many obstacles, simulated using Gazebo 11.
06 December 2021, by

Team builds first living robots that can reproduce

AI-designed Xenobots reveal entirely new form of biological self-replication—promising for regenerative medicine.
02 December 2021, by

Exploring ROS2 using wheeled Robot – #3 – Moving the robot

In this post you’ll learn how to publish to a ROS2 topic using ROS2 C++. We are moving the robot Dolly robot, simulated using Gazebo 11.
30 November 2021, by

An inventory of robotics roadmaps to better inform policy and investment

Silicon Valley Robotics in partnership with the Industrial Activities Board of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, is compiling an up to date resource list of various robotics, AIS and AI roadmaps, national or otherwise.
29 November 2021, by

Robots can be companions, caregivers, collaborators — and social influencers

People are hardwired to respond socially to technology that presents itself as even vaguely social. While this may sound like the beginnings of a Black Mirror episode, this tendency is precisely what allows us to enjoy social interactions with robots and place them in caregiver, collaborator or companion roles.
26 November 2021, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association