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WeRobot 2015 Panel 1: Anthropomorphizing robots, with Kate Darling

Anthropomorphism of AI and robotics is common in film, where plot often hinges on the confusion between what is really a human and what is an imposter. In the sci-fi movie Bladerunner, an empathy test is used to determine whether an agent is really human, or if it is a 'replicant'. An agent's response to questions focused on the treatment of animals are deemed an indicator of that agent's "humanity".

Anthropomorphism of AI and robotics is common in film, where plots often hinge on the confusion between what is really a human and what is an imposter. In the sci-fi movie Bladerunner, an empathy test is used to determine whether an agent is really human, or if it is a ‘replicant’. 

As we increasingly create spaces where robotic technology interacts with humans, our tendency to project lifelike qualities onto robots raises questions around use and policy. In this We Robot 2015 panel titled “Who’s Johnny? (Anthropomorphizing Robots)”, Kate Darling explores the effects of anthropomorphic framing in the introduction of robotic technology, and discusses concerns about anthropomorphism in certain contexts. She also argues that there are cases where encouraging anthropomorphism is desirable, and that because people respond to framing, it could serve as a tool to separate these cases. Moderated by Ken Goldberg.

 

WeRobot 2015 Panel 1: “Who’s Johnny? (Anthropomorphizing Robots)”
Author: Kate Darling
Discussant: Ken Goldberg
Paper: http://bit.ly/1bxvbfR



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Tech Policy Lab University of Washington is a unique, interdisciplinary collaboration at the University of Washington.
Tech Policy Lab University of Washington is a unique, interdisciplinary collaboration at the University of Washington.





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