Robohub.org
 

Distributed Autonomous Robotic Systems (DARS 2012)

by
16 December 2012



share this:

My colleague Nils Napp from Radhika Nagpal‘s lab at Harvard attended the DARS symposium this year and agreed to share some highlights with us.

This time around, the biannual Symposium on Distributed Autonomous Robotic Systems (DARS) was at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore Maryland. The single track featured a great lineup of invited and technical talks. For example, Prof. Gracias gave a fascinating keynote talk about his group’s work in self-folding microstructures and progress toward making swarms of untethered micro-robots. They designed tiny metal grippers that can perform biopsies in difficult-to-reach areas and be retrieved in bulk via a magnet.

A striking aspect of the diverse (and generally fantastic) technical program was that the exotic Brazil-nut effect kept surfacing. With random agitation granular mixtures of different sized particles spontaneously separate, even against gravity! Larger particles usually end up on top: a fact that can readily be exploited for picking out large brazil-nuts from a mixture that includes less desirable varieties. Applied to robots, this effect can be used to design shockingly simple motion strategies to transport relatively large objects or sort robots.

K. Sugawara, D. Reishus, N. Correll (2012): Object Transportation by Granular Convection Using Swarm Robots. (download paper)

Gauci M., Chen J., Dodd T.J., and Groß R. Evolving Aggregation Behaviors in Multi-Robot Systems with Binary Sensors. (download paper)

As a special treat during the poster session, students from Sarah Bergbreiter’s group at the University of Maryland demoed some really neat, really small, and (comparatively) really fast mini-robots called TinyTeRPs.

Also, mark your calendars for 2014 when DARS will be in Korea!

More on the author: Nils Napp works on distributed robotic construction using iterative amorphous depositions. You might have seen his foam-depositing robot on the Automaton Blog or Robohub. At DARS he presented a paper to reliably build ramps in unstructured environments. The idea is to exploit the low-level mechanical feedback of compliant building materials to make construction more robust. As a result, relatively simple local strategies for interacting with irregularly shaped, partially built structures can give rise to robust, adaptive global properties.



tags: , , , ,


Sabine Hauert is President of Robohub and Associate Professor at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory
Sabine Hauert is President of Robohub and Associate Professor at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory





Related posts :



The one-wheel Cubli

Researchers Matthias Hofer, Michael Muehlebach and Raffaello D’Andrea have developed the one-wheel Cubli, a three-dimensional pendulum system that can balance on its pivot using a single reaction wheel. How is it possible to stabilize the two tilt angles of the system with only a single reaction wheel?
30 June 2022, by and

At the forefront of building with biology

Raman is, as she puts it, “a mechanical engineer through and through.” Today, Ritu Raman leads the Raman Lab and is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.
28 June 2022, by

Hot Robotics Symposium celebrates UK success

An internationally leading robotics initiative that enables academia and industry to find innovative solutions to real world challenges, celebrated its success with a Hot Robotics Symposium hosted across three UK regions last week.
25 June 2022, by

Researchers release open-source photorealistic simulator for autonomous driving

MIT scientists unveil the first open-source simulation engine capable of constructing realistic environments for deployable training and testing of autonomous vehicles.
22 June 2022, by

In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks to Maria Telleria, who is a co-founder and the CTO of Canvas. Canvas makes a drywall finishing robot and is based in the Bay Area. In this interview, Maria talks ab...
21 June 2022, by and

Coffee with a Researcher (#ICRA2022)

As part of her role as one of the IEEE ICRA 2022 Science Communication Awardees, Avie Ravendran sat down virtually with a few researchers from academia and industry attending the conference.





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association