Robohub.org
 

FIRST hosts 20,000 students in world’s largest robotics competition

by
03 May 2016



share this:
Photo Credit: Adriana M. Groisman

Photo Credit: Adriana M. Groisman

More than 20,000 students from around the globe traveled to St. Louis to compete in the annual FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Championship. The 4-day event ended Saturday night in front of a crowd of more than 40,000.

robotic-competition1

Photo Credit: Adriana M. Groisman

Approximately 78,500 students on 3,140 teams from 24 countries competed during the 2016 season. More than 900 teams from 42 countries came to St. Louis to compete in one of the four FIRST programs:

  1. FIRST® LEGO® League Jr. (grades K-3, ages 6-9)
  2. FIRST® LEGO® League (grades 4 to 8, 9 to 14-year-olds in the U.S, Canada, and Mexico; 9 to 16-year-olds outside the U.S., Canada, and Mexico)
  3. FIRST® Tech Challenge (grades 7 to 12, 12 to 18-year-olds)
  4. FIRST® Robotics Competition (grades 9 to 12, ages 14 to 18)

Hundreds of awards were given, from the Chairman’s Award (given to a Las Vegas team) to the Against-All-Odds Award. Click here to see the complete list of award winners.

Dean Kamen, FIRST Founder, in his closing remarks, urged students to use their imagination to solve some of the world’s greatest challenges:

“We believe that if you can show kids that the tools of mathematics and engineering empower them to do some really cool, really fun things, they’ll get passionate about it.”

Colin Gillespie, President, LEGO® Education North America, said:

“Research shows we’re significantly more creative when we’re 5 years old than we are when we’re 25, but you can keep your creativity alive with playful learning experiences like those you get through FIRST. You’re rekindling that awesome creativity and can see the world in ways (we) can only hope to imagine.”

NASA Administrator Maj. Gen. Charles Bolden said:

“I can’t stress how important it is to have young people like each of you pursuing STEM. You and your Mentors have demonstrated that it can be a lot of hard work, but also a lot of fun. It’s important work that can make a real difference to the world’s future.”



tags: , ,


Frank Tobe is the owner and publisher of The Robot Report, and is also a panel member for Robohub's Robotics by Invitation series.
Frank Tobe is the owner and publisher of The Robot Report, and is also a panel member for Robohub's Robotics by Invitation series.





Related posts :



An inventory of robotics roadmaps to better inform policy and investment

Silicon Valley Robotics in partnership with the Industrial Activities Board of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, is compiling an up to date resource list of various robotics, AIS and AI roadmaps, national or otherwise.
29 November 2021, by

Robots can be companions, caregivers, collaborators — and social influencers

People are hardwired to respond socially to technology that presents itself as even vaguely social. While this may sound like the beginnings of a Black Mirror episode, this tendency is precisely what allows us to enjoy social interactions with robots and place them in caregiver, collaborator or companion roles.
26 November 2021, by

Interview with Tao Chen, Jie Xu and Pulkit Agrawal: CoRL 2021 best paper award winners

The award-winning authors describe their work on a system for general in-hand object re-orientation.
24 November 2021, by
ep.

341

podcast

How Simbe Robotics is Innovating in Retail, with Brad Bogolea

Brad Bogolea discusses the innovation behind Tally, the autonomous robot from Simbe Robotics. Tally collects real-time analytics inside retail stores to improve the customer shopping experience, as well as the efficiency of managing the store.
23 November 2021, by

Top 10 recommendations for a video gamer who you’d like to read (or even just touch) a book

Here is the Robotics Through Science Fiction Top 10 recommendations of books that have robots plus enough world building to rival Halo or Doom and lots of action or puzzles to solve. What’s even cooler is that you can cleverly use the “Topics” links to work in some STEM talking points.
20 November 2021, by

Top tweets from the Conference on Robot Learning #CoRL2021

In this post we bring you a glimpse of the conference through the most popular tweets about the conference written last week. Cool robot demos, short and sweet explanation of papers and award finalists to look forward to next year's edition.
19 November 2021, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association