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Industrial human-robot collaboration becoming more common | MIT Technology Review

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27 April 2014



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“Industrial robots often sit behind metal fences, their mechanical arms a blur of terrific speed and precision; to prevent serious injury to humans (or worse), these robots are normally shut down when anyone enters their workspace. … In recent years, however, the fences have started to disappear as a gentler breed of robot has entered the workplace and new features have made even conventional industrial robots safer to be around.”

See on www.technologyreview.com




John Payne





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