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Mind-controlled robotic legs? It’s possible | The Telegraph

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07 August 2014



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A research group led by electrical and computer engineering expert Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal is working on a brain-machine interface that could enable users to control a pair of robotic legs with their mind.

The scientists are testing the technology on the robotic exoskeleton developed by Rex Bionics, a New Zealand based company led by British healthcare investor Jeremy Curnock Cook.

Mr Curnock Cook’s comments came as he unveiled the company’s maiden set of interim results, following its £10m stock market debut earlier this year.

The company, which posted a £1.246m loss for the six months to May, is using its new funds to establish a sales force for the robotic legs, which have taken ten years to develop.

Read more on The Telegraph



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Hallie Siegel robotics editor-at-large
Hallie Siegel robotics editor-at-large





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