Robohub.org
 

MIT, Lockheed Martin launch long-term research collaboration

by
17 May 2016



share this:
Lockheed Martin CTO Keoki Jackson '89, SM '92, ScD '97 (center, left) and MIT AeroAstro department head Jaime Peraire congratulate each other after signing a research collaboration agreement between the two organizations. Initial research will focus on robotics and autonomous systems. Photo: William Litant/MIT AeroAstro

Lockheed Martin CTO Keoki Jackson ’89, SM ’92, ScD ’97 (center, left) and MIT AeroAstro department head Jaime Peraire congratulate each other after signing a research collaboration agreement between the two organizations. Initial research will focus on robotics and autonomous systems.
Photo: William Litant/MIT AeroAstro

In a new collaborative initiative in autonomy and robotics, MIT and Lockheed Martin scientists will focus on innovations needed to enable generation-after-next autonomous systems. Improvements in human/machine teaming and navigation in complex environments are among the research challenges that Lockheed Martin is inviting MIT faculty and their students to help solve.

“We have a valued relationship with MIT and are looking forward to moving to this next chapter and partnering with world-class researchers,” said Keoki Jackson ’89, SM ’92, ScD ’97, Lockheed Martin’s chief technology officer. “We are focused on advancing technology and recruiting top talent, both of which are crucial for creating the next generation of aerospace systems.”

A master agreement between MIT and Lockheed Martin, led by the Institute’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AeroAstro), and in collaboration with MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, was formalized May 13 at a signing ceremony on campus. It provides a multiyear framework between MIT and Lockheed Martin for collaborative research, exchange of visiting scientists, support of student undergraduate research opportunities, fellowships, and internships at Lockheed Martin.

“We’re making the investment today, not just in research and development of the technologies that could have the most impact on future generations, but in the talent of these amazing individuals that will truly shape the future,” said Padraig Moloney ’00, Lockheed Martin program manager and architect of the new initiative. “We’re confident that our relationship and collaboration in these technical areas will influence the fields of autonomy and robotics for the next 15-20 years.”

AeroAstro department head Jaime Peraire said, “We’re delighted with this new agreement, which furthers a relationship between MIT AeroAstro and Lockheed Martin that goes back many years. It formalizes our partnership, and aligns with MIT’s mode of conducting research and education by melding academic rigor with real engineering challenges and applications.”

Initial research will be conducted by AeroAstro professors Jonathan How, Nick Roy, Sertac Karaman, Julie Shah, and Russ Tedrake and Department of Mechanical Engineering Professor Sangbae Kim.



tags: , , ,


MIT News





Related posts :



New imaging method makes tiny robots visible in the body

Microrobots have the potential to revolutionize medicine. Researchers at the Max Planck ETH Centre for Learning Systems have now developed an imaging technique that for the first time recognises cell-​sized microrobots individually and at high resolution in a living organism.
20 May 2022, by

A draft open standard for an Ethical Black Box

Within the RoboTIPS project, we have developed and tested several model of Ethical Black Boxes, including one for an e-puck robot, and another for the MIRO robot.
19 May 2022, by

Unable to attend #ICRA2022 for accessibility issues? Or just curious to see robots?

There are many things that can make it difficult to attend an in person conference in the United States and so the ICRA Organizing Committee, the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society and OhmniLabs would like to help you attend ICRA virtually.
17 May 2022, by
ep.

350

podcast

Duckietown Competition Spotlight, with Dr Liam Paull

Dr. Liam Paull, cofounder of the Duckietown competition talks about the only robotics competition where Rubber Duckies are the passengers on an autonomous driving track.
17 May 2022, by

Designing societally beneficial Reinforcement Learning (RL) systems

In this post, we aim to illustrate the different modalities harms can take when augmented with the temporal axis of RL. To combat these novel societal risks, we also propose a new kind of documentation for dynamic Machine Learning systems which aims to assess and monitor these risks both before and after deployment.
15 May 2022, by

Innovative ‘smart socks’ could help millions living with dementia

‘Smart socks’ that track rising distress in the wearer could improve the wellbeing of millions of people with dementia, non-verbal autism and other conditions that affect communication.
13 May 2022, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association