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Synched gears interlock at 4,500 rpm on state-of-the-art servo system

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06 October 2013



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Synched gears interlock at 4,500 rpm on a state of the art servo system

These three gears, rotating at 4,500 rpm, are completely in sync, and are running on an AC servo system developed by Mitsubishi Electric.

“Here we’re demonstrating how even if three gears overlap like this, they can be completely prevented from interfering, by moving them with exactly the same timing. This can be done because the motors are controlled with micron-level accuracy. So, there’s no interference, even when they’re running at such high speed.”

“As servo systems are motors, they’re used to drive a variety of machines. Nowadays, they’re used for applications that require extremely high precision, such as mounting smartphone components and coating the glass panels in LCD TVs.”

“This system uses three motors. First, there’s a linear motor, which runs in a straight line downwards. Then, there’s a direct-drive motor, which rotates horizontally, and finally, there’s the motor that turns this gear. By making the timing of the three correspond completely, we can achieve this kind of demonstration. In this demo, the rev rate is 4,500 rpm. The top speed is 6,000 rpm.”

As the three motors in each unit are being controlled by a single multi-axis servo amp, if the timing is correct, the braking energy of one axis can be used as energy for another, in the same way as a regenerative braking system, reducing energy usage.

“This system is currently used in the automotive, chip-making, printing, and food industries. From now on, we think it will be extended to purposes apart from factory automation, such as healthcare.”




DigInfo TV is a Tokyo-based online video news platform dedicated to producing original coverage of cutting edge technology, research and products from Japan.
DigInfo TV is a Tokyo-based online video news platform dedicated to producing original coverage of cutting edge technology, research and products from Japan.





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