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robot ethics

What legal rights should a robot have? In this video, Polo Sant’Anna Valdera, one of the leading research centres for robotics, raises this important question. Innovation raises new legal and ethical issues. The European Parliament wants to address these issues so robotics continues to flourish in 2017.

In this interview, we invited Prof. Rafael Capurro to share his insights on past, current, and future trends in robot ethics.

On Friday November 13th, AJung Moon from the Open Roboethics initiative (ORi) delivered a statement at the United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW) Meeting of States Parties.

If you’re in the business of making ethical robots, then sooner or later you have to face the question: how ethical is your ethical robot?

The mechanical arm

What should a robot nurse do when a cancer patient begs for more morphine but the supervising doctor is not available to approve the request? Should a self-driving car prevent its owner from taking over manual driving when she is drunk but urgently needs to get her child to the hospital? Which faintly crying voice from the earthquake rubble should a rescue robot follow – the child’s or the older adult’s?

Drunk-Business-Man-whiskey

In a care scenario, a robot may have been purchased by the patient, by the doctor or hospital (which sent it home with the patient to monitor their health), or by a concerned family member who wants to monitor their relative. In the latest ORi poll we looked at people’s attitudes about whether a care robot should prioritize its owner’s wishes over those of the patient. Here are the results.

In a care scenario, a robot may have been purchased by the patient, by the hospital (which sent it home with the patient to monitor their health), or by a concerned family member who wants to monitor their relative. Should a care robot prioritize its owner’s wishes over those of the patient?

Alex Leveringhaus, author of a recent Oxford Martin School policy paper titled Robo-Wars: The Regulation of Robotic Weapons discusses the ethics of autonomous weapons, urges governments to recognise the increasing prominence of these weapons in contemporary and future forms of warfare, and proposes steps towards suitable regulation.

by   -   August 20, 2014

Last week the Waterloo-based Clearpath publicly pledged not to develop lethal autonomous weapons in support of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots. While the Campaign has garnered significant support since its launch, it has not previously had support from the for-profit robotics sector – making Clearpath’s public statement a noteworthy demonstration of corporate responsibility, particularly given the company’s background in military applications.



On Artificial Intelligence for Wildlife Conservation
June 11, 2019


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