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Uncanny Valley

The device named “Spark” flew high above the man on stage with his hands waving in the direction of the flying object. In a demonstration of DJI’s newest drone, the audience marveled at the Coke can-sized device’s most compelling feature: gesture controls. Instead of a traditional remote control, this flying selfie machine follows hand movements across the sky. Gestures are the most innate language of mammals, and including robots in our primal movements means we have reached a new milestone of co-existence.

Researcher Joffrey Becker explores why robots can sometimes appear as strange creatures to us and seeks to better understand people’s tendency to anthropomorphise machines.

designingjibo

Pepper, Jibo and Milo make up the first generation of social robots, leading what promises to be a cohort with diverse capabilities and future applications. But what are social robots and what should they be able to do? This article gives an overview of theories that can help us understand social robotics better.

Yueh-Hsuan Weng interviews Prof. Hiroko Kamide about her theory of “One Being for Two Origins”, derived from the teachings of the Buddha, and how her philosophy might impact the emerging field of roboethics.

by   -   November 20, 2013

uncanny-valley

Many of us from the Robohub team were at the landmark Uncanny Valley session at IROS this year – it turned out to be one of those wish-I’d-been-there events for anyone unlucky enough to have missed it.

Even people who were attending that day knew they would want to relive the experience: I was recording audio of the speakers for my notes, and several people sitting nearby slipped me their cards in hope that I would share the file with them later.

Lucky for all of us, Erico Guizzo captured the whole session on video and this is now

by   -   November 13, 2013

Tokyo_Big_Sight

Photo credit: Taichi on Wikimedia Commons.

Robohub team members just returned from an exciting trip to Tokyo, where we attended the 2013 IROS conference and the concurrent iREX robot expo. With so many excellent projects, so many insightful lectures, and so many innovative robots — not to mention the many consecutive tracks! — it was hard for any one person to take it all in.

This month we asked our Robotics by Invitation experts to tell us about what stood out for them at this year’s event. Here’s what they have to say …

by   -   November 13, 2013

Two images remain in my mind from IROS 2013 last week in Tokyo. The respect for Professor Emeritus Mori and his charting of the uncanny valley in relation to robotics, and the need for a Watson-type synthesis of all the robotics-related scientific papers produced every year.

by   -   November 13, 2013

For me, the highlight of IROS was the Uncanny Valley special session, although the sheer size of the IROS conference and the parallel iRex industrial and service robot expo also gave much food for thought. In particular, the new coworking robots from Kawada [video] and ABB look very interesting, but it’s clear that it still takes a long time for research to transition into robust applied robotics.

by   -   June 5, 2013

This article discusses personality design and how proper natural language interface design includes body language.  The article is about the design of hearts and minds for robots. It argues that psychology must be graphically represented, that body language is a means to do that, and points out why this is kind of funny.

Comrades, we live in a bleak and humourless world.  Here we are thirteen years into the twenty-first century, and we all carry around Star Trek style tri-corders, we have access to almost all human opinions via this awesome global computer network, we have thousands and thousands of channels we can flip through on television, we have something like 48,000 people signed up to go colonize Mars, and we even have robots roaming around up there, taking samples of that planet. But we still don’t have robots that can tell a good joke.

by   -   May 4, 2013

This article outlines the problems of today’s phone and online help systems and offers solutions to conversational systems of tomorrow. The article is about the design of hearts and minds for robots, considers the virtual voice as a legitimate robot, and takes a fast pass at the psychology of robot-human interaction.



Robot Operating System (ROS) & Gazebo
August 6, 2019


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