Robohub.org
 

Draw precise freehand circles and copy paste drawings with the dePENd table

by
29 November 2012



share this:
12-0215-r

This table helps you to draw precise freehand circles and lines. It is under development by a group in the Yasuaki Kakehi Lab at Keio University.

By using a computer to control the XY position of a magnet under the surface of the table, it implements, on paper, drawing methods utilized in computer graphics.

“I’ll place an ordinary ballpoint pen on the table. Now, I can semi-automatically draw a precise circle, or a straight line, or an illustration prepared in advance. In other words, while I draw with the pen, this system lets me switch to accurate rendering like in computer graphics, such as drawing a precise circle, by assisting me with the pen.”

When drawing, you can use a regular ballpoint pen with a metal tip, or a digital pen. If you use a ballpoint pen, the position where you start drawing has to correspond with the origin on the XY grid, but if you use a digital pen, the system recognizes its location and you can start drawing from any position.

“The digital pen understands the coordinates of the pen position. So, you can start from where you want, and also save and copy the picture you’ve drawn. This means you can copy and paste your original drawing repeatedly.”

“Apart from drawing figures that require precision, we think this system will have various applications. For example, in distance education, students could learn to draw by feeling the sensation of how a teacher draws.”

“Rather than limiting ourselves to pens, we’d like to extend this project to other items used with paper, such as scissors and compasses. We hope to bring in digital technology to assist users with those, too.”



tags:


DigInfo TV is a Tokyo-based online video news platform dedicated to producing original coverage of cutting edge technology, research and products from Japan.
DigInfo TV is a Tokyo-based online video news platform dedicated to producing original coverage of cutting edge technology, research and products from Japan.





Related posts :



Flocks of assembler robots show potential for making larger structures

Researchers make progress toward groups of robots that could build almost anything, including buildings, vehicles, and even bigger robots.
25 November 2022, by

Holiday robot wishlist for/from Women in Robotics

Are you looking for a gift for the women in robotics in your life? Or the up and coming women in robotics in your family? Perhaps these suggestions from our not-for-profit Women in Robotics organization will inspire!
24 November 2022, by and

TRINITY, the European network for Agile Manufacturing

The Trinity project is the magnet that connects every segment of agile with everyone involved, creating a network that supports people, organisations, production and processes.
20 November 2022, by

Fighting tumours with magnetic bacteria

Researchers at ETH Zurich are planning to use magnetic bacteria to fight cancerous tumours. They have now found a way for these microorganisms to effectively cross blood vessel walls and subsequently colonise a tumour.
19 November 2022, by

Combating climate change with a soft robotics fish

We have fabricated a 3D printed, cable-actuated wave spring tail made from soft materials that can drive a small robot fish.
17 November 2022, by

#IROS2022 best paper awards

Here we bring you the papers that received an award this year at IROS in case you missed them.
14 November 2022, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association