Robohub.org
 

Plenary and Keynote talks focus series #1: Yukie Nagai & Danica Kragic

by
28 July 2021



share this:

Would you like to stay up to date with the latest robotics & AI research from top roboticists? The IEEE/RSJ IROS2020 (International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems) recently released their Plenary and Keynote talks in the IEEE RAS YouTube channel. We’re starting a new focus series with all their talks. This week, we’re featuring Professor Yukie Nagai (University of Tokyo), talking about cognitive development in humans and robots, and Professor Danica Kragic (KTH Royal Institute of Technology), talking about the impact of robotics and AI in the fashion industry.

Prof. Yukie Nagai – Cognitive Development in Humans and Robots: New Insights into Intelligence

Abstract: Computational modeling of cognitive development has the potential to uncover the underlying mechanism of human intelligence as well as to design intelligent robots. We have been investigating whether a unified theory accounts for cognitive development and what computational framework embodies such a theory. This talk introduces a neuroscientific theory called predictive coding and shows how robots as well as humans acquire cognitive abilities using predictive processing neural networks. A key idea is that the brain works as a predictive machine; that is, the brain tries to minimize prediction errors by updating the internal model and/or by acting on the environment. Our robot experiments demonstrate that the process of minimizing prediction errors leads to continuous development from non-social to social cognitive abilities. Internal models acquired through their own sensorimotor experiences enable robots to interact with others by inferring their internal state. Our experiments inducing atypicality in predictive processing also explains why and how developmental disorders appear in social cognition. I discuss new insights into human and robot intelligence obtained from these studies.

Bio: Yukie Nagai is a Project Professor at the International Research Center for Neurointelligence, the University of Tokyo. She received her Ph.D. in Engineering from Osaka University in 2004 and worked at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Bielefeld University, and Osaka University. Since 2019, she leads Cognitive Developmental Robotics Lab at the University of Tokyo. Her research interests include cognitive developmental robotics, computational neuroscience, and assistive technologies for developmental disorders. Her research achievements have been widely reported in the media as novel techniques to understand and support human development. She also serves as the research director of JST CREST Cognitive Mirroring.

Prof. Danica Kragic – Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Impacts on the Fashion Industry

Abstract: This talk will overview how robotics and artificial intelligence can impact fashion industry. What can we do to make fashion industry more sustainable and what are the most difficult parts in this industry to automate? Concrete examples of research problems in terms of perception, manipulation of deformable materials and planning will be discussed in this context.

Bio: Danica Kragic is a Professor at the School of Computer Science and Communication at the Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. She received MSc in Mechanical Engineering from the Technical University of Rijeka, Croatia in 1995 and PhD in Computer Science from KTH in 2001. She has been a visiting researcher at Columbia University, Johns Hopkins University and INRIA Rennes. She is the Director of the Centre for Autonomous Systems. Danica received the 2007 IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Early Academic Career Award. She is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences and Young Academy of Sweden. She holds a Honorary Doctorate from the Lappeenranta University of Technology. Her research is in the area of robotics, computer vision and machine learning. She received ERC Starting and Advanced Grant. Her research is supported by the EU, Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research and Swedish Research Council. She is an IEEE Fellow.



tags: ,


Daniel Carrillo-Zapata was awared his PhD in swarm robotics at the Bristol Robotics Lab in 2020. He now fosters the culture of "scientific agitation" to engage in two-way conversations between researchers and society.
Daniel Carrillo-Zapata was awared his PhD in swarm robotics at the Bristol Robotics Lab in 2020. He now fosters the culture of "scientific agitation" to engage in two-way conversations between researchers and society.





Related posts :



Robot Talk Episode 86 – Mario Di Castro

In the latest episode of the Robot Talk podcast, Claire chatted to Mario Di Castro from CERN all about robotic inspection and maintenance in hazardous environments.
24 May 2024, by

Congratulations to the #ICRA2024 best paper winners

The winners and finalists in the different categories have been announced.
20 May 2024, by

Robot Talk Episode 85 – Margarita Chli

In the latest episode of the Robot Talk podcast, Claire chatted to Margarita Chli from the University of Cyprus all about vision, navigation, and small aerial drones.
17 May 2024, by

What’s coming up at #ICRA2024?

Find out what's on the programme at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation.
10 May 2024, by

Octopus inspires new suction mechanism for robots

Suction cup grasping a stone - Image credit: Tianqi Yue The team, based at Bristol Robotics Laboratory, studied the structures of octopus biological suckers,  which have superb adaptive s...
18 April 2024, by

Open Robotics Launches the Open Source Robotics Alliance

The Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF) is pleased to announce the creation of the Open Source Robotics Alliance (OSRA), a new initiative to strengthen the governance of our open-source robotics so...





Robohub is supported by:




Would you like to learn how to tell impactful stories about your robot or AI system?


scicomm
training the next generation of science communicators in robotics & AI


©2024 - Association for the Understanding of Artificial Intelligence


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association