Robohub.org
 

MIT CSAIL’s 6-foot-tall NASA humanoid robot has landed

by
28 April 2016



share this:
Valkyrie

By Adam Conner-Simons, MIT CSAIL

This week MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) received an unusual package: a six-foot-tall, 300-pound humanoid robot that NASA hopes to have serve on future space missions to Mars and beyond.

A team of researchers led by CSAIL principal investigator Russ Tedrake will program their new “Valkyrie” robot to autonomously perform a variety of challenging tasks that would allow it to help or even replace astronauts on missions.

Valkyrie is fully electric, with four body cameras, 28 torque-controlled joints and 44 degrees of freedom. The robot boasts more than 200 individual sensors, including 38 on each hand (six on each palm, and eight along each of its four fingers).

Other researchers participating in the project include professors Leslie Kaelbling and Tomas Lozano-Perez, who will conduct work on high-level autonomy.

“Our work is about vetting the robot and seeing what it is capable of,” says Tedrake, whose team received a two-year research grant from NASA for the project. “If we can integrate the autonomy work with our planning and control algorithms, it could result in an unprecedented level of autonomous capabilities for a humanoid robot.’

robot-nasa2

 

Tedrake’s team at CSAIL’s Robot Locomotion Group has extensive experience developing autonomous robots. The group spent the last three years doing research as part of the DARPA Robotics Challenge, where they programmed another six-foot-tall robot named Atlas to complete a series of tasks that included opening doors, turning valves, drilling holes, climbing stairs and driving a car.

Besides the CSAIL team, NASA also awarded a Valkyrie robot to Northeastern University in conjunction with the University of Massachusetts at Lowell.



tags: , , ,


CSAIL MIT The Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory – known as CSAIL ­– is the largest research laboratory at MIT and one of the world’s most important centers of information technology research.
CSAIL MIT The Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory – known as CSAIL ­– is the largest research laboratory at MIT and one of the world’s most important centers of information technology research.





Related posts :



Hot Robotics Symposium celebrates UK success

An internationally leading robotics initiative that enables academia and industry to find innovative solutions to real world challenges, celebrated its success with a Hot Robotics Symposium hosted across three UK regions last week.
25 June 2022, by

Researchers release open-source photorealistic simulator for autonomous driving

MIT scientists unveil the first open-source simulation engine capable of constructing realistic environments for deployable training and testing of autonomous vehicles.
22 June 2022, by

In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks to Maria Telleria, who is a co-founder and the CTO of Canvas. Canvas makes a drywall finishing robot and is based in the Bay Area. In this interview, Maria talks ab...
21 June 2022, by and

Coffee with a Researcher (#ICRA2022)

As part of her role as one of the IEEE ICRA 2022 Science Communication Awardees, Avie Ravendran sat down virtually with a few researchers from academia and industry attending the conference.

Seeing the robots at #ICRA2022 through the eyes of a robot

Accessbility@ICRA2022 and OhmniLabs provided three OhmniBots for the conference, allowing students, faculty and interested industry members to attend the expo and poster sessions.
17 June 2022, by

Communicating innovation: What can we do better?

The question on what role communications play in forming the perception of innovative technology was discussed in this workshop. Experts explained how the innovation uptake should be supported by effective communication of innovations: explaining the benefits, tackling risks and fears of the audiences, and taking innovation closer to the general public.
15 June 2022, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association