Robohub.org
 

Optical camouflage tech removes backseat of a car, transparent interior the goal

by
06 November 2012



share this:

 

12-0204-r

A system that makes the backseat of a car look transparent is currently being developed by a research group at Keio University.

The system applies optical camouflage technology, using recursive reflection, to vehicles. The technology was developed by Professor Masahiko Inami. This system has been optimized to make the backseat look transparent from the driver’s viewpoint.

“The main feature of our system is, it makes things look as if you can really see through them, rather than giving an indirect view of what’s behind. For example, with a system that shows things on a monitor, you can understand your car’s position and where any obstacles are. But the point about our system is, it gives a sense of depth, by making things appear where they actually should be when you look back.”

In this system, video from the rear cameras is projected onto the backseat using a half-mirror. The video is processed by a computer to make things appear actual-sized, making the driver feel as if the back seat really is transparent.

“The screen is made of a special material called a recursive reflector. Optically, it has an interesting characteristic because it reflects light back in the direction of incidence. When we thought of applying it to automobiles, the advantage was, it gives a clear image in daylight, rather than in a dark place like this.”

Currently, only the backseat has been made transparent, but ultimately, the aim is to make the car’s interior completely transparent through 360 degrees, with no blind spots.

“Currently, the system shows one point clearly. But from now on, we’d like to keep increasing the number of viewpoints. We plan to enable the system to be easily used by anyone.”

“We’re discussing the possibility of collaboration with automakers. There are lots of issues in this research, so we’d like to collaborate with a variety of businesses. Regarding a commercial version, we hope we’ll be able to offer one in about five years.”



tags: , ,


DigInfo TV is a Tokyo-based online video news platform dedicated to producing original coverage of cutting edge technology, research and products from Japan.
DigInfo TV is a Tokyo-based online video news platform dedicated to producing original coverage of cutting edge technology, research and products from Japan.





Related posts :



How robots and bubbles could soon help clean up underwater litter

Everyone loves to visit the seaside, whether to enjoy the physical benefits of an exhilarating swim or simply to relax on the beach and catch some sun. But these simple life affirming pleasures are easily ruined by the presence of litter, which if persistent can have a serious negative impact on both the local environment and economy. However, help is at hand to ensure the pristine nature of our coastlines.
19 January 2022, by

Maria Gini wins the 2022 ACM/SIGAI Autonomous Agents Research Award

Congratulations to Maria Gini on winning this prestigious award, recognising her research and leadership in the field of robotics and multi-agent systems.
18 January 2022, by

UN fails to agree on ‘killer robot’ ban as nations pour billions into autonomous weapons research

Given the pace of research and development in autonomous weapons, the U.N. meeting might have been the last chance to head off an arms race.
16 January 2022, by

Science Magazine robot videos 2021

A compilation of Science Magazine videos featuring robotics research that were released during last year.
14 January 2022, by

CBQ: Commercial-grade Autonomous Mowers, Safety, and Dogfooding | Sense Think Act Podcast #11

In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks to Charles Brian Quinn (aka, CBQ), CEO and a Co-Founder of Greenzie. Greenzie make an autonomous driving system for commercial lawn mowers. We talk about Greenzie's...
11 January 2022, by and

California’s AV testing rules apply to Tesla’s “FSD”

Tesla is testing its self-proclaimed “full self-driving” vehicles on California roads without complying with the testing requirements of California’s automated driving law.
10 January 2022, by and





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association