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robot law

by and   -   March 15, 2016
Studio shot of stack of Lego robot at computer. Photo: bigstockphoto
Lego robot at computer.

One day, robots will present difficult legal challenges. This seems to be the consensus among commentators. And who am I to disagree? I have myself argued, right here on the digital pages of Slate, that robotics will generate no fewer puzzles for the law than the last transformative technology of our time—the Internet. Future courts will have to decide, for instance, whether a home robot manufacturer is responsible for the apps that run on it and whether to hold anyone accountable for robot behavior no one intended or foresaw.

Nearly 60 years of American case law indicate that while robot technology has been developing by leaps and bounds, the courts’ concept of robots is confused and largely stuck in the past. If we are to depend on our legal systems for clarity — especially as new technologies take us into uncharted territory — the courts will need partner closely with technology experts to develop a more nuanced understanding of robotics. Legal scholar Ryan Calo shows us the way.

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The issue is often raised whether robotics needs to be regulated. While some believe that there is no need to intervene because regulation may stifle innovation, others believe that indeed there is need to intervene since robotics may otherwise prove disruptive. However, both arguments are partial, and for this very reason wrong. Thanks to existing laws, a robot (like any other physical phenomenon) is already instantly regulated in the very moment materializes .

by   -   October 28, 2014

case_for_a_federal_Robotics_Commission_Ryan_CaloEarlier this month the Brookings Institute published a paper by Ryan Calo titled “The case for a federally regulated robotics commission“. As much as I appreciate the thoughtfulness and readability of this whitepaper – and the broad distribution that the Brookings connection affords – I noticed that the paper does not mention the National Robotics Initiative (NRI), the Congressional Caucus for Robotics, the Congressional Unmanned Systems Caucus, nor any of the OSTP coordination activities or the US Roadmap for Robotics.

by   -   September 24, 2014

I suggest that our current robotics policy agenda needs to be reformed and better informed. This article provides a review of some recent policy reports and considers the changing shape of 21st century scientific debate.

by   -   September 23, 2014

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Updated 24/09/14 Do robots need to be regulated? Several legal and policy experts think that robot regulations should be developed early and revised often. Others – especially those working on research and development – worry that regulation could put a damper on advancement in robotics before it even has a chance to take off. At Robohub we’ve been following this topic closely and are planning to bring you more views on the issue – so watch this space. In the meantime, check out these recent articles and reports on regulating robots .



Robot Operating System (ROS) & Gazebo
August 6, 2019


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