Robohub.org
 

‘World’s Most Dangerous Rivalry’ stoked by bowing Abe robot at CIROS

by
17 July 2015



share this:
Bowing_Abe_robot_China_Japan

The long-term rivalry between China and Japan, often characterised as the “World’s Most Dangerous Rivalry,” was exacerbated at the CIROS show held in Shanghai last week by a bowing Prime Minister Abe look-alike robot and an enterprising Chinese sales group.

The robot, dressed in a suit and bowing to visitors, according to the International Business Times, “came to be called ‘Apologizing Abe’, and photos and videos of the Abe look-alike robot have gone viral across social media in China. The ‘Apologizing Abe’ robot is being seen by many in China as a mocking reference to Abe’s refusal to issue a formal apology for Japan’s wartime atrocities during World War II, as the Japanese Prime Minister only expressed ‘deep remorse’ earlier this year.”

“It’s just a way to attract attention from visitors and with absolutely no political implication,” Wang Guofeng, sales agent for the reported manufacturer of the robot, Shanghai Jinghong Robot Co Ltd, told China’s Global Times. The company is selling the robot on its website for 39,000 yuan ($6,282), according to the report.

The CIROS show had over 100 exhibitors and a large crowd of business people, educators and consultants interested in finding out about how robots might help them in their shops, plants and factories. A report on the show, by people who attended, walked the floors, and talked with the exhibitors, will appear soon on The Robot Report.



tags: , , ,


Frank Tobe is the owner and publisher of The Robot Report, and is also a panel member for Robohub's Robotics by Invitation series.
Frank Tobe is the owner and publisher of The Robot Report, and is also a panel member for Robohub's Robotics by Invitation series.





Related posts :



Robots can be companions, caregivers, collaborators — and social influencers

People are hardwired to respond socially to technology that presents itself as even vaguely social. While this may sound like the beginnings of a Black Mirror episode, this tendency is precisely what allows us to enjoy social interactions with robots and place them in caregiver, collaborator or companion roles.
26 November 2021, by

Interview with Tao Chen, Jie Xu and Pulkit Agrawal: CoRL 2021 best paper award winners

The award-winning authors describe their work on a system for general in-hand object re-orientation.
24 November 2021, by
ep.

341

podcast

How Simbe Robotics is Innovating in Retail, with Brad Bogolea

Brad Bogolea discusses the innovation behind Tally, the autonomous robot from Simbe Robotics. Tally collects real-time analytics inside retail stores to improve the customer shopping experience, as well as the efficiency of managing the store.
23 November 2021, by

Top 10 recommendations for a video gamer who you’d like to read (or even just touch) a book

Here is the Robotics Through Science Fiction Top 10 recommendations of books that have robots plus enough world building to rival Halo or Doom and lots of action or puzzles to solve. What’s even cooler is that you can cleverly use the “Topics” links to work in some STEM talking points.
20 November 2021, by

Top tweets from the Conference on Robot Learning #CoRL2021

In this post we bring you a glimpse of the conference through the most popular tweets about the conference written last week. Cool robot demos, short and sweet explanation of papers and award finalists to look forward to next year's edition.
19 November 2021, by

Finding inspiration in starfish larva

Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a tiny robot that mimics the movement of a starfish larva. It is driven by sound waves and equipped with tiny hairs that direct the fluid around it, just like its natural model. In the future, such microswimmers could deliver drugs to diseased cells with pinpoint accuracy.
17 November 2021, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association