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Tag : military robotics

by ,   -   March 19, 2014

DAROA LS3 - Boston DynamicsDAROA LS3 - Boston Dynamics

When Google bought Boston Dynamics last December, the news made headlines, but it was not the first time the Internet giant has invested in DARPA-funded robotics. As part of Robohub’s Big Deals series, we asked Gill Pratt, Program Manager of DARPA’s Defense Sciences Office, to shed some light on what DARPA thinks about Google’s robotics acquisitions , and what it might mean to the robotics and open source communities.

by ,   -   February 5, 2014

Big_dog_military_Boston_Dynamics

Boston Dynamics’ BigDog.

When we imagine the future of warfare, we often envision a battlefield where humanoid robots and other machines fight alongside or in the place of human soldiers. From the droids of Star Wars to The Terminator’s cyborg soldiers, robots play a prominent role in our collective vision of future combat.

by   -   February 2, 2013

Mel Torrie of Autonomous Solutions

As guest speaker for a CMURobotics RI Seminar, titled Lessons Learned Bootstrapping a Robotic Vehicle Company, Mel Torrie of Autonomous Solutions (Petersboro, Utah), describes how he got into robotics in the first place, why he made the jump from academia to a startup, how that startup survived their “near-death experience”, what the company has been doing since, and what he’s learned along the way. There is a strong agricultural theme, both in his original motivation and in the history and current operation of Autonomous Solutions.

View on YouTube

Mel Torrie was recently interviewed by Robots Podcast

by   -   April 2, 2009

The Inkwell discussion mentioned below is now underway. See Inkwell.vue topic #352 on The WELL.

 

For two weeks, beginning April 29th, Brookings Institution Senior Fellow P.W. Singer will be on hand in The WELL’s Inkwell.vue conference to discuss his latest book “Wired For War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century”.

 

Obligatory caveat: while military robotics is a far cry from what this blog is about, some of the technologies developed for military robots are likely to prove useful in the more mundane context of managing productive land. But while cultibotics remains a dream of what might be, the development and deployment of military robotics is happening now, posing serious concerns for the near future as the machines become both more autonomous and more lethal. Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics are nowhere to be seen.

 

Caveat to the caveat: having now read most of the book, I realize there are other, far more realistic, reasons for concern than the extremely unlikely Skynet-gone-bats scenario. Singer is a subtle thinker, and I’m anticipating an interesting discussion.

 

Reposted from Cultibotics.