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by   -   October 18, 2018


MIT researchers have built a system that takes a step toward fully automated smart homes, by identifying occupants even when they’re not carrying mobile devices. Image: Chelsea Turner, MIT

By Rob Matheson

Developing automated systems that track occupants and self-adapt to their preferences is a major next step for the future of smart homes. When you walk into a room, for instance, a system could set to your preferred temperature. Or when you sit on the couch, a system could instantly flick the television to your favorite channel.

by   -   October 18, 2018
Baxter – Rethink Robotics

With the recent demise of Rethink Robotics, there were dozens of testimonials that the company revolutionized industrial robotics and kickstarted the collaborative robotics trend. There is no doubt that Baxter and Sawyer were truly innovative and more sophisticated than the average industrial robot. They were also safer than most other cobots, though at the expense of precision. So was Rethink Robotics the pioneer of collaborative robots?

by   -   October 18, 2018

By Xue Bin (Jason) Peng and Angjoo Kanazawa

Whether it’s everyday tasks like washing our hands or stunning feats of acrobatic prowess, humans are able to learn an incredible array of skills by watching other humans. With the proliferation of publicly available video data from sources like YouTube, it is now easier than ever to find video clips of whatever skills we are interested in.

by , and   -   October 9, 2018

From driving rovers on Mars to improving farm automation for Indian women, once again we’re bringing you a list of 25 amazing women in robotics! These women cover all aspects of the robotics industry, both research, product and policy. They are founders and leaders, they are investigators and activists. They are early career stage and emeritus. There is a role model here for everyone! And there is no excuse – ever – not to have a woman speaking on a panel on robotics and AI.

by , and   -   October 6, 2018

The deployment of connected, automated, and autonomous vehicles presents us with transformational opportunities for road transport. These opportunities reach beyond single-vehicle automation: by enabling groups of vehicles to jointly agree on maneuvers and navigation strategies, real-time coordination promises to improve overall traffic throughput, road capacity, and passenger safety. However, coordinated driving for intelligent vehicles still remains a challenging research problem, and testing new approaches is cumbersome. Developing true-scale facilities for safe, controlled vehicle testbeds is massively expensive and requires a vast amount of space. One approach to facilitating experimental research and education is to build low-cost testbeds that incorporate fleets of down-sized, car-like mobile platforms.

by   -   October 6, 2018
Baxter Robot from Rethink Robotics – Source: YouTube

Rethink Robotics shut down this week, closing the chapter on a remarkable journey making collaborative robots a reality.

by   -   October 5, 2018
MIT researchers have devised a way to help robots navigate environments more like humans do.

By Rob Matheson

When moving through a crowd to reach some end goal, humans can usually navigate the space safely without thinking too much. They can learn from the behavior of others and note any obstacles to avoid. Robots, on the other hand, struggle with such navigational concepts.

by   -   October 1, 2018

The 2018 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (#IROS2018) will be held for the first time in Spain in the lively capital city of Madrid from 1 to 5 October. This year’s motto is “Towards a Robotic Society”.

by   -   October 1, 2018


By Jessica Montgomery, Senior Policy Adviser

Advances in AI technologies are contributing to new products and services across industries – from robotic surgery to debt collection – and offer many potential benefits for economies, societies, and individuals.

With this potential, come questions about the impact of AI technologies on work and working life, and renewed public and policy debates about automation and the future of work.

by   -   October 1, 2018

I read an article entitled Games Hold the Key to Teaching Artificial Intelligent Systems, by Danny Vena, in which the author states that computer games like Minecraft, Civilization, and Grand Theft Auto have been used to train intelligent systems to perform better in visual learning, understand language, and collaborate with humans. The author concludes that games are going to be a key element in the field of artificial intelligence in the near future. And he is almost right.

In my opinion, the article only touches the surface of artificial intelligence by talking about games. Games have been a good starting point for the generation of intelligent systems that outperform humans, but going deeper into the realm of robots that are useful in human environments will require something more complex than games. And I’m talking about simulations.

by   -   October 1, 2018

Sensors placed throughout a retirement home helped the ENRICHME robot to keep track of the movements and activities of residents taking part in the project’s trial. Image credit – ENRICHME

by Steve Gillman

Almost a fifth of the European population are over 65 years old, but while quality of life for this age bracket is better than ever before, many will at some point suffer from a decline in their mental abilities.

by   -   September 27, 2018

Currently also featured on the cover of MAKE magazine, Jillian Ogle is a robot builder, game designer and the founder of Let’s Robot a live streaming interactive robotics community, where users can control real robots via chatroom commands, or put their on own robots online. Some users can even make money with their robots on the Let’s Robot platform which allows viewers to make micropayments to access some robots. All you need is a robot doing something that’s interesting to someone else, whether it’s visiting new locations or letting the internet shoot ping pong balls at you while you work!

by and   -   September 26, 2018
DelFly Nimble in forward flight. Credits: TU Delft

Bio-inspired flapping wing robots hold a great potential. The promise is that they can fly very efficiently even at smaller scales, while being able to fly fast, hover, and make quick maneuvers. We now present a new flapping wing robot, the DelFly Nimble, that is so agile that it can even accurately mimic the high-speed escape maneuvers of fruit flies. In the scientific article, published in Science, we show that the robot’s motion resembles so much that of the fruit fly that it allowed us to better understand the dynamics of fruit flies during escape maneuvers. Here at Robohub, we wish to give a bit more background about the motivation and process of how we got to the final design of this robot, and what we think the future may bring.

by   -   September 18, 2018

The multi-joint soft exosuit consists of textile apparel components worn at the waist, thighs and calves that guide mechanical forces from an optimized mobile actuation system attached to a rucksack via cables to the ankle and hip joints. In addition, a new tuning method helps personalize the exosuit’s effects to wearers’ specific gaits. Credit: Harvard Biodesign Lab

By Benjamin Boettner

In the future, smart textile-based soft robotic exosuits could be worn by soldiers, fire fighters and rescue workers to help them traverse difficult terrain and arrive fresh at their destinations so that they can perform their respective tasks more effectively. They could also become a powerful means to enhance mobility and quality of living for people suffering from neurodegenerative disorders and for the elderly.

by   -   September 18, 2018

MIT computer scientists have developed a system that learns to identify objects within an image, based on a spoken description of the image.
Image: Christine Daniloff

By Rob Matheson

MIT computer scientists have developed a system that learns to identify objects within an image, based on a spoken description of the image. Given an image and an audio caption, the model will highlight in real-time the relevant regions of the image being described.

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Presented work at IROS 2018 (Part 1 of 3)
November 12, 2018


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