Robohub.org
 

CyPhy Works and Righthand Robotics get funded

by
15 October 2015



share this:
funding-methods

The varied world of robotics appears to be in favor with venture capitalists.  CyPhy Works just got $22 million to scale up building UAVs for the consumer market, and Righthand Robotics got $3.3M to enable development of their smart robotic order-picking system.


CyPhy-hover-1100x733CyPhy Works
, with this $22M “B” round of funding, added three new strategic partners: UPS Strategic Enterprise Fund, Motorola Solutions Venture Capital and VC Bessemer Venture Partners. CyPhy Works got its start as a drone maker by building technology to inspect bridges, dams and other infrastructure facilities. Its tether technology enabled it to stay aloft indefinitely, stream what it sees in high definition, and have its communications be secure and unjammable. These capabilities make their drones valuable to defense, security, police, fire fighers and search operators as well.

Recently, in a Kickstarter campaign that raised almost $900,000, CyPhy added a new trick to its arsenal of unique technologies: level and smooth flight without the use of gimbaling devices (it has to do with using six rotors instead of four). It is this latter product that is being readied for the consumer market with some of the funding in this “B” round.

CyPhy has raised $35.35M since launching in 2010.


RightHand-Robotics-handRightHand Robotics
received $3.3M in funding from unknown sources to continue development of its low-cost automatic grasping technology for use with material handling and bin picking. RightHand’s technology doesn’t require per-object programming or setup; rather, with flexible grasping and fingertip barometric and tactile sensors, items can be grasped by “feel”.

RightHand’s rubber-jointed fingers bend to match the shape of objects, gripping them without software controls. The hand can also move into different configurations, depending on the size and shape of the object being grasped. Robotic arms fitted with RightHand’s compliant hand can grasp a wide variety of items from shelves, bins, or cases, and the company is pursuing studies in e-commerce order fulfillment, flexible manufacturing and other material handling marketplaces.



tags: , ,


Frank Tobe is the owner and publisher of The Robot Report, and is also a panel member for Robohub's Robotics by Invitation series.
Frank Tobe is the owner and publisher of The Robot Report, and is also a panel member for Robohub's Robotics by Invitation series.





Related posts :



Robot Talk Episode 64 – Rav Chunilal

In the latest episode of the Robot Talk podcast, Claire chatted to Rav Chunilal from Sellafield all about robotics and AI for nuclear decommissioning.
31 December 2023, by

AI holidays 2023

Thanks to those that sent and suggested AI and robotics-themed holiday videos, images, and stories. Here’s a sample to get you into the spirit this season....
31 December 2023, by and

Faced with dwindling bee colonies, scientists are arming queens with robots and smart hives

By Farshad Arvin, Martin Stefanec, and Tomas Krajnik Be it the news or the dwindling number of creatures hitting your windscreens, it will not have evaded you that the insect world in bad shape. ...
31 December 2023, by

Robot Talk Episode 63 – Ayse Kucukyilmaz

In the latest episode of the Robot Talk podcast, Claire chatted to Ayse Kucukyilmaz from the University of Nottingham about collaboration, conflict and failure in human-robot interactions.
31 December 2023, by

Interview with Dautzenberg Roman: #IROS2023 Best Paper Award on Mobile Manipulation sponsored by OMRON Sinic X Corp.

The award-winning author describe their work on an aerial robot which can exert large forces onto walls.
19 November 2023, by

Robot Talk Episode 62 – Jorvon Moss

In the latest episode of the Robot Talk podcast, Claire chatted to Jorvon (Odd-Jayy) Moss from Digikey about making robots at home, and robot design and aesthetics.
17 November 2023, by





©2024 - Association for the Understanding of Artificial Intelligence


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association