Robohub.org
 

Mirobot: An open source WiFi robot for kids

by
14 May 2014



share this:
mirobot_med

Mirobot is a robotics kit that’s designed to get kids more interested in technology, engineering and programming. Children solder and build it themselves, and then can use a drag-and-drop programming tool in their browser to get the robot to draw shapes and patterns.

All of the designs and software are open source, which means that once it has been used for its original purpose, it can be adapted to do new and unforeseen things. Although primarily a drawing robot, it can also use additional sensors in order to be able to experiment with making it autonomous. Arduino compatibility means that extending and modifying it is well documented and straightforward. Using WiFi with JSON over WebSockets to communicate which means that it can be easily controlled from a web browser as well as easily integrated into any other programming language or tool.

Mirobot was inspired by a visit to the London Science Museum when I came across one of the original Turtle robots used in schools in the UK in the late 70s and 80s. I used to use these robots as a child and thought it would be interesting to make a modern version that was based around open hardware platforms like the Arduino. The idea that what was once a very expensive piece of equipment could now be made inexpensively really appealed to me. Moving from one-per-school to one-per-child is a great advance and enables much greater learning.

It’s currently on Kickstarter and has made great progress – it’s 320% funded now with a little over a week left to go.



tags: , , , , ,


Ben Pirt





Related posts :



Robot science fiction books of 2021

2021 produced four new scifi books with good hard science underpinning their description of robots and three where there was less science but lots of interesting ideas about robots.
23 January 2022, by

How robots learn to hike

A new control approach that enables a legged robot, called ANYmal, to move quickly and robustly over difficult terrain.
20 January 2022, by

How robots and bubbles could soon help clean up underwater litter

Everyone loves to visit the seaside, whether to enjoy the physical benefits of an exhilarating swim or simply to relax on the beach and catch some sun. But these simple life affirming pleasures are easily ruined by the presence of litter, which if persistent can have a serious negative impact on both the local environment and economy. However, help is at hand to ensure the pristine nature of our coastlines.
19 January 2022, by

Maria Gini wins the 2022 ACM/SIGAI Autonomous Agents Research Award

Congratulations to Maria Gini on winning this prestigious award, recognising her research and leadership in the field of robotics and multi-agent systems.
18 January 2022, by

UN fails to agree on ‘killer robot’ ban as nations pour billions into autonomous weapons research

Given the pace of research and development in autonomous weapons, the U.N. meeting might have been the last chance to head off an arms race.
16 January 2022, by

Science Magazine robot videos 2021

A compilation of Science Magazine videos featuring robotics research that were released during last year.
14 January 2022, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association