news    views    podcast    learn    |    about    contribute     republish    

BMI

by   -   October 1, 2015

Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) — where brain waves captured by electrodes on the skin are used to control external devices such as a robotic prosthetic — are a promising tool for helping people who have lost motor control due to injury or illness. However, learning to operate a BMI can be very time consuming. In a paper published in Nature Scientific Reports, a group from CNBI, EPFL and NCCR Robotics show how their new feedback system can speed up the training process by detecting error messages from the brain and adapting accordingly.

by   -   April 13, 2015

artificial_tail_BMI_Keio

Researchers from the Keio Institue of Pure and Applied Sciences (KiPAS) are working to reveal the mechanism by which newly acquired knowledge and information is transmitted and evolves among organisms with intelligence. This research is being done through pseudo-augmentation of body structures using a brain-machine interface, to investigate the process by which groups of individuals adapt to novel bodies and environments, using methods from the natural sciences.

Conor Russomanno is the founder and research developer of OpenBCI, a low-cost open-source hardware platform that records the brain’s electrical signals and uses devices and software languages to make the data easily accessible. Russomanno and co-founder Joel Murphy aim to accelerate the advancement of BCI through collaborative hardware and software development.

brain_creative_commons

Link to audio file (23:28), or  listen on iTunes

In this interview, TechEmergence talks to Dr. Beata Jarosiewicz from Brown’s BrainGate project about the science of making sense of the brain’s inner electrical activity, and how the brain might be used to control a variety of devices if calibrated correctly. 

Dan Bacher has always been fascinated by two things: electrical engineering and neuroscience. While these interests may seem divergent, the synthesis of them led him to Brown University’s BrainGate Group, where he is the Senior Research and Development Engineer. Says Bacher, “applying technology to the area of neuroscience just always fascinated me.”

BrainGateIf the human brain is considered a computer, what does that mean for science and our lives? Could we repair damaged areas, replace damaged parts, or even upgrade our own minds? It might sound like little more than the stuff of science fiction, but with current advances in brain-machine interfaces, science fiction is fast becoming science fact.

Imagine if playing music was as simple at looking at your laptop screen. Now it is thanks to Kenneth Camilleri and his team of researchers from the Department of Systems and Control Engineering and the Centre for Biomedical Cybernetics at the University of Malta, who have developed a music player that can be controlled by the human brain.



inVia Robotics: Product-Picking Robots for the Warehouse
October 7, 2019


Are you planning to crowdfund your robot startup?

Need help spreading the word?

Join the Robohub crowdfunding page and increase the visibility of your campaign