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by   -   February 15, 2018

Robots in the workforce will give rise to new jobs for humans, including safety engineers, robot specialists and augmented reality experts, according to researchers. Image credit – ‘FANUC robots’, by Mixabest – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

Robots are already changing the way we work – particularly in factories – but worries that they will steal our jobs are only part of the picture, as new technologies are also opening up workplace opportunities for workers and are likely to create new jobs in the future.

by   -   February 14, 2018

The European Commission is launching a new call for Flagships. Existing Flagships include the Human Brian Project, and the Graphene Flagship – each funded at the level of 1B EUR.

Given the excitement around the field of robotics and its potential to benefit society and the economy, we’ve brought together the robotics community to apply for a Robotics Flagship Preparatory Action. The Robotics Flagship aims to drive developments in European Robotics for the next 10 years. You can read more about it on this website.

by   -   February 11, 2018

In this episode of Robots in Depth, Per Sjöborg speaks with Dave Rollinson from Hebi Robotics about their modular robotics systems.

by   -   February 10, 2018

I recently led a group of 20 American tech investors to Israel in conjunction with the UJA and Israel’s Ministry of Economy and Industry. We witnessed firsthand the innovation that has produced more than $22 billion of investments and acquisitions within the past year. We met with the University that produced Mobileye, with the investor that believed in its founder, and the network of every multinational company supporting the startup ecosystem. Mechatronics is blooming in the desert from the CyberTech Convention in Tel Aviv to the robotic labs at Capsula to the latest in autonomous driving inventions in the hills of Jerusalem.

by   -   February 8, 2018


Humans physically interact with each other every day – from grabbing someone’s hand when they are about to spill their drink, to giving your friend a nudge to steer them in the right direction, physical interaction is an intuitive way to convey information about personal preferences and how to perform a task correctly.

by   -   February 2, 2018

Completely unfolded, the milliDelta with 15 mm-by-15 mm-20 mm roughly compares to a cent piece, and uses piezoelectric actuators, and flexural joints in its three arms to control high-frequency movements of a stage on top. Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

By Benjamin Boettner

Because of their high precision and speed, Delta robots are deployed in many industrial processes, including pick-and-place assemblies, machining, welding and food packaging. Starting with the first version developed by Reymond Clavel for a chocolate factory to quickly place chocolate pralines in their packages, Delta robots use three individually controlled and lightweight arms that guide a platform to move fast and accurately in three directions. The platform is either used as a stage, similar to the ones being used in flight simulators, or coupled to a manipulating device that can, for example, grasp, move, and release objects in prescribed patterns. Over time, roboticists have designed smaller and smaller Delta robots for tasks in limited workspaces, yet shrinking them further to the millimeter scale with conventional manufacturing techniques and components has proven fruitless.

by   -   February 2, 2018

In this episode of Robots in Depth, Per Sjöborg speaks with Aseem Prakash, a Futurist at the Center for Innovating the Future, about how we can prepare for co-existing with robots and AI.

by   -   February 2, 2018

MIT Media Lab spinout Ori is developing smart robotic furniture that transforms into a bedroom, working or storage area, or large closet — or slides back against the wall — to optimize space in small apartments.
Courtesy of Ori

By Rob Matheson

Imagine living in a cramped studio apartment in a large city — but being able to summon your bed or closet through a mobile app, call forth your desk using voice command, or have everything retract at the push of a button.

by   -   February 2, 2018
K. Daron Acemoglu, the Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics at MIT, is a leading thinker on the labor market implications of artificial intelligence, robotics, automation, and new technologies.
Photo: Jared Charney

By Meg Murphy
K. Daron Acemoglu, the Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics at MIT, is a leading thinker on the labor market implications of artificial intelligence, robotics, automation, and new technologies. His innovative work challenges the way people think about these technologies intersect with the world of work. In 2005, he won the John Bates Clark Medal, an honor shared by a number of Nobel Prize recipients and luminaries in the field of economics.

by   -   January 29, 2018

In 2016, the European Union co-funded 17 new robotics projects from the Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for research and innovation.

by   -   January 29, 2018

In this episode of Robots in Depth, Per Sjöborg speaks with Daniel Pizzata about how his passion for modular robotics led him to start Modbot, a company building robotics platforms. The goal of Modbot is to bring robots out of the research labs and make them accessible to everyone.

by   -   January 22, 2018
From left: MIT researchers Scott H. Tan, Jeehwan Kim, and Shinhyun Choi
Image: Kuan Qiao

By Jennifer Chu

When it comes to processing power, the human brain just can’t be beat.

Packed within the squishy, football-sized organ are somewhere around 100 billion neurons. At any given moment, a single neuron can relay instructions to thousands of other neurons via synapses — the spaces between neurons, across which neurotransmitters are exchanged. There are more than 100 trillion synapses that mediate neuron signaling in the brain, strengthening some connections while pruning others, in a process that enables the brain to recognize patterns, remember facts, and carry out other learning tasks, at lightning speeds.

by   -   January 17, 2018

In this episode of Robots in Depth, Per Sjöborg speaks with Erin Rapacki about how the FIRST robotics competition was a natural and inspiring way into her career spanning multiple robotics companies.

by and   -   January 15, 2018

The 2018 Nissan Leaf receives CES2018 Tech For a Better World Innovation Award.

Cars, cars, cars, cars. CES2018, the Consumer Technology Association’s massive annual expo, was full of self driving electric and augmented cars. Every hardware startup should visit CES before they build anything. It has to be the most humbling experience any small robotics startup could have. CES2018 is what big marketing budgets look like. And as robotics shifts more and more to consumer facing, this is what the competition looks like.

by   -   January 12, 2018

A new AI machine creates new music from songs it’s fed, mimicking their style. Image credit – FlowMachines

by Kevin Casey

The first full-length mainstream music album co-written with the help of artificial intelligence (AI) was released on 12 January and experts believe that the science behind it could lead to a whole new style of music composition.

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March 4, 2018

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