news    views    talk    learn    |    about    contribute     republish     archives     calls/events

Tag : jobs


Robohub is an online platform that brings together leading communicators in robotics research, start-ups, business, and education from around the world.
by   -   March 14, 2014

Dr Carl Frey and Dr Michael Osborne recently made headlines around the world with their Oxford Martin School study - The Future of Employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerization?, which showed that nearly half of US jobs could be at risk of being replaced through automation.


by   -   February 17, 2014

“Robotics is the fastest growing industry in the world, poised to become the largest in the next Sophie hr robotdecade.” That’s the opening quote from Littler Mendelson (the world’s largest labor and employment law firm) in a new report titled: The Transformation of the Workplace Though Robotics, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and Automation.



by   -   April 15, 2013

For the next week, Robohub will host a special focus on robots and jobs, featuring original articles from leading experts in the fields of robotics and automation. The goal of the series is to explore the shifting employment landscape as robots become more prevalent in the workplace, and we’ve got a great lineup!


by   -   April 15, 2013

Although there is a surge in early stage personal and service robotics activity right now, it will take time to find out which technologies and companies will be the real winners, and only then will we learn the real affect on the overall jobs picture. I do believe, though, that we will see a new set of ROI’s emerge that will alter the jobs landscape, resulting in new jobs in a growing US-based robotics industry, as well as new job skills required to work synergistically with safe service robots.


by   -   April 15, 2013

To coincide with Robohub’s Jobs Focus, we asked our panelists to weigh in on the role that robots play in the wider economy, and whether this is a good thing or a bad thing for employment numbers. Here’s what they have to say:

John-DulchinosJohn Dulchinos feature article: “The great equalizer: How robotics frees manufacturers from consolidating in low-wage nations”

These days it is hard to read an article about the future of robots that does not include a reference to jobs. As a pure roboticist, I object to the constant connection between the two, but as a concerned citizen I think it is a worthwhile discussion …

Read more →

 

 

Raffaello-DAndrea.jpgRaffaello D’Andrea on “Do robots kill jobs?”

There is no doubt that robots, and automation in general, replace humans in the work-force: all productivity-enhancing tools, by definition, result in a decrease in the number of man-hours required to perform a given task …

Read more →

 


Mark Tilden
Mark Tilden on “Do robots kill jobs?”

Robots do kill jobs but they’re crappy jobs, so good riddance.  If you’ve ever had a job you were desperate for the money, but immediately regretted after you got it, then you know what I mean. …

Read more →

We hope you will join the discussion. Feel free to post your comment below.

See all the posts in Robohub’s Jobs Focus →


by   -   April 14, 2013

There is no doubt that robots, and automation in general, replace humans in the work-force: all productivity-enhancing tools, by definition, result in a decrease in the number of man-hours required to perform a given task. 

This Robotics By Invitation contribution is part of Robohub’s Jobs Focus.

There may be some regional effects that result in an immediate increase in jobs (for example, setting up a new manufacturing plant and hiring workers to maintain the machines), but the global effect is indisputable: overall, robots replace human workers.

What is also true, however, is that robots create jobs as well.  This is simply Economics 101: there is a redistribution of labor from low skilled jobs – what robots can do now, and the foreseeable future – to higher skilled jobs. An analogy from the North Carolina Department of Agriculture: “In 1790, 93% of the population of the United States was rural, most of them farmers. By 1990, only 200 years later, barely 2% of our population are farmers.”  What is also true is that there are many more software engineers now than there were in 1790; or mechanics; or physiotherapists; or professional athletes; or artists.

So the debate about robots replacing human workers is, for the most part, a tired and old one; just replace the word ‘robot’ with any productivity-enhancing tool or development. And as long as the process is gradual, one can reasonably argue that society benefits as a whole.

But the question does have merit, because human workers are at an artificial disadvantage relative to their robot counterparts, and the culprit is artificially low interest rates.  Large companies such as Procter and Gamble can issue 10 year corporate bonds that have astronomically low yields of 2.3%.  With money so cheap, productivity tools – such as robots – that would not be economically viable under normal interest rates and yields are now a bargain.  Why should a company ‘rent’ labor (a human worker) when it can ‘buy’ it (a robot)?  Have we not seen this storyline before?

Read more answers →

See all the posts in Robohub’s Jobs Focus →

 

[Photo credit: Petr Kratochvil.]


by   -   April 14, 2013

Robots do kill jobs but they’re crappy jobs, so good riddance.  If you’ve ever had a job you were desperate for the money, but immediately regretted after you got it, then you know what I mean.

This Robotics By Invitation contribution is part of Robohub’s Jobs Focus.

The anxiety occurs when robots have anthropomorphic similarities that people wrongly associate with human ambition.  When a (semi) humanoid takes away the whole menial job that used to be done by a person, there’s an instinctive focus to blame the machine, not the corporation optimizing its bottom line.  Optimizing tasks to reduce costs is a good thing.  It’s just a shame we haven’t kept up with the social reforms needed so people who had those jobs before could find better jobs now.

So the short answer is robot-brained corporations kill jobs.  Robots are just the anthropomorphic patsies that get blamed.

Still, now I have to go and stare worriedly at my toaster.

Read more answers →

See all the posts in Robohub’s Jobs Focus →


by   -   April 13, 2013

There can be no doubt that technological progress has resulted in a far more prosperous society. Technology has often disrupted entire industries and, in some cases — as with the mechanization of agriculture — destroyed millions of jobs. In the long run, however, the economy has always adjusted and new  jobs have been created, often in entirely new industries. Why then should we be concerned that the revolution in robotics and artificial intelligence will lead to sustained unemployment? 


by   -   April 13, 2013

Just five years ago, anybody who spoke of technological unemployment was labeled a luddite, a techno-utopian, or just simply someone who doesn’t understand economics. Today things are very different – anybody from New York Times columnist Tom Friedman to CBS are jumping on the bandwagon.



by   -   January 23, 2013


At an International Federation of Robotics (IFR) CEO Round Table held at Automate 2013, in Chicago, IFR executives presented a recap of a new research report on the positive impact of industrial robots on employment.


by   -   July 13, 2012

… Job Opening at ReThink Robotics “for a developer relations engineer—a person to lead development of a ROS-based SDK for a new low cost manipulator that will be readily available for researchers and educators, and to interact with researchers worldwide to make sure the SDK is useful for them,” says CTO and founder Rodney Brooks.
… Imagine a ROS-based software developer kit (SDK) to make apps for ReThink robots. Then imagine that you can put your app online and sell it to companies around the world with a similar need – just like the app store for your iPhone and iPad.
Here’s the link where you can apply. Good luck!


by   -   June 27, 2012


During May 2012, 6,000 job ads for robotics were posted – a 29% year-over-year growth and twice the volume of similar ads in May 2010, reported Wanted Analytics, a Canadian research firm providing “business intelligence for the talent marketplace.”

33% of the job postings were for healthcare practitioners with a robotics skill set and Phoenix, Detroit, New York City, Sacramento and Chicago had the highest number of want ads.

Good info in want ads: Lenovo in Shenzhen wants a PhD Roboticist to lead movement to vision and interactive intelligence based on cloud computing.


by   -   February 14, 2012


According to WANTED Analytics, a real-time talent analytics site, there were over 2,100 U.S. job ads for robotics skills in January, 2012, a 44% year-over-year growth rate from 2011. The majority of listings (650) were for engineering jobs and represented a 51% year-over-year increase.

Underlying this surge in employment, the International Federation of Robotics reported that investment in robot automation surged globally to 150,000 unitis sold in 2011 – a year-over-year growth of 30%.





Editor's Picks