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Recent robotics-related IPOs

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26 April 2014



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3new-iposSince late November, 2013 there have been three robotic companies that have gone public on U.S. and global stock exchanges: Medtech, Ekso Bionics and Cyberdyne.

Ekso Bionics Holdings (OTCBB:EKSO):

In an alternative public offering in January, 2014, Ekso Bionics, a Delaware corporation headquartered in Richmond, California became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ekso Bionics Holdings, a Nevada corporation. The new holding company changed its name from PN Med Group which was listed on the over-the-counter stock exchange as EKSO. Simultaneously the new company completed a $30.3 million private placement. The launch price was $2.50 per share.

Since then, Ekso has split off its technology development into a separate division chartered to further intellectual property through engineering contracts and research grants including the DoD and Lockheed (which has licensed Ekso’s HULC military version of exoskeleton) and collaborated with 3D Systems to debut the first ever 3D-printed hybrid robotic suit.

Since 2005, Ekso Bionics has researched and developed robotic exoskeletons, AKA wearable robots, to augment human strength, endurance and mobility. The company’s first commercially available product (called Ekso) has helped thousands of people living with paralysis take millions of steps not otherwise possible.

Medtech SAS (EPA:ROSA):

In November, 2013, Medtech SAS, launched an IPO worth approximately $27 million (€20 million) at a launch price of €26.75 with the ticker symbol ROSA. The stock is listed on Euronext Paris (EPA) Exchange.

Medtech is a France-based company that manufactures medical robots for surgical assistance. The Company’s main product, the ROSA, combines neurosurgical planning software, navigation and robotic functions, haptic technology and visualization capabilities for both cranial neurosurgery and orthopedic surgery.

Cyberdyne Inc (TYO:7779):

Not really an IPO, but notable anyway, on March 26, 2014, Cyberdyne let its stock be listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange at a price of ¥3,700 ($36.06) with the ticker symbol of 7779. The stock launched with a flurry of publicity from scary to straightforward. Cyberdyne, after all, was the name of Skynet of the Terminator series of Arnold Schwarzenegger movies and HAL, the name of Cyberdyne’s line of exoskeletons, was the name of the computer in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Subsequent to the launch, in a private placement of approximately $1 million dollars, 304,200 privately held shares were sold to raise funds needed for the acquisition of fixed assets and investment in a subsidiary.

Cyberdyne was established in June 2004 as a spin-off from the University of Tsukuba to build a strong research and development organization to provide technology and treatment methods in the field of physical movement and rehabilitation therapy. Working with insurers (healthcare and worker’s compensation) in Germany and Japan, Cyberdyne has developed a complete line of exoskeleton products (HAL) for brain and mobility disabilities as well as non-medical purposes such as eldercare and worker assistance devices.



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Frank Tobe is the owner and publisher of The Robot Report, and is also a panel member for Robohub's Robotics by Invitation series.
Frank Tobe is the owner and publisher of The Robot Report, and is also a panel member for Robohub's Robotics by Invitation series.





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