Robohub.org
 

Ringo: An Arduino-powered robot bug for kids

by
13 March 2015



share this:

Ringo Purple 800xRingo is a friendly pet robot bug based on the Arduino UNO that was inspired and co-designed by my 1st grade daughter Hailey and my 3rd grade son Parker, who are both already writing C code. We started out intending to build just one robot together, but we realized something much greater could be done in producing Ringo for the masses. There is only a few days left of our crowdfunding campaign – we hope it will catch the curiosity of young engineers and also have a particular appeal to girls who may not otherwise become interested in coding and technology.

Ringo sports a handful of sensors and goodies including a 3-axis accelerometer, 3-axis gyroscope, communication and line following sensors, six RGB LED’s, a music chirper, onboard battery charging, and more. The robot is pre-loaded with 10 different behaviors, enabling a user to begin playing with it right out of the box using the included IR remote control.

Code is written using the Arduino IDE and is compatible with standard Arduino functions. As Ringo is fully open source, users are encouraged to look at the source code for the included behaviors and begin to edit and customize. Tutorials will be published before shipments begin, making it easy to get started. More advanced users will be challenged to find interesting applications for the collection of sensors and smarts including swarming behaviors. The upcoming Plum Geek website will host an area for code exchange where users from around the world can build on eachothers’ code and collaborate. Favorite behaviors will be highlighted for new users to download and play with.

Ringo_3

Virtual pets are typically appealing to children, but Ringo’s advanced capabilities and open source hardware will make it a favorite among people of all ages and introduce them to STEM technology. The development intentionally played on the cute, buggy persona so Ringo would have an appeal to girls who are largely under-represented in the computer science field.  Ringo could be the perfect way to introduce them to the joys of programming.

The project reached its funding goal in just over 24 hours, and to date, has raised over 450% of that goal. There’s only a week left, so go back the campaign to get in on the first production run if you’re interested. Plum Geek will also be donating Ringo units to schools and building a school curriculum based on the robot so your support will go a long way to putting this interesting robot in the hands of students.

Ringo_1 Ringo_2

tags: , , ,


Kevin King is the founder of PlumGeek.
Kevin King is the founder of PlumGeek.





Related posts :



Tesla’s Optimus robot isn’t very impressive – but it may be a sign of better things to come

Musk has now unveiled a prototype of the robot, called Optimus, which he hopes to mass-produce and sell for less than US$20,000 (A$31,000).
04 October 2022, by

Bipedal robot achieves Guinness World Record in 100 metres

Cassie the robot, developed at Oregon State University, records the fastest 100 metres by a bipedal robot.
03 October 2022, by and

Breaking through the mucus barrier

A capsule that tunnels through mucus in the GI tract could be used to orally administer large protein drugs such as insulin.
02 October 2022, by

Women in Tech leadership resources from IMTS 2022

There’ve been quite a few events recently focusing on Women in Robotics, Women in Manufacturing, Women in 3D Printing, in Engineering, and in Tech Leadership. One of the largest tradeshows in the US is IMTS 2022. Here I bring you some resources shared in the curated technical content and leadership sessions.
29 September 2022, by and

MIT engineers build a battery-free, wireless underwater camera

The device could help scientists explore unknown regions of the ocean, track pollution, or monitor the effects of climate change.
27 September 2022, by

How do we control robots on the moon?

In the future, we imagine that teams of robots will explore and develop the surface of nearby planets, moons and asteroids - taking samples, building structures, deploying instruments.
25 September 2022, by , and





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association