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forbes_30under30_2015_index

Forbes “30 under 30″ list celebrates the achievements of 30 game changers in 20 different industries — 600 in total — of the brightest young entrepreneurs and innovators who are challenging conventional wisdom. The list highlights some interesting trends in robotics, AI, intelligence energy storage, and automation.

Credit: University of California - San Diego
Credit: University of California – San Diego

A new U.S. Robotics Roadmap released Oct. 31 calls for better policy frameworks to safely integrate new technologies, such as self-driving cars and commercial drones, into everyday life. The document also advocates for increased research efforts in the field of human-robot interaction to develop intelligent machines that will empower people to stay in their homes as they age. It calls for increased education efforts in the STEM fields from elementary school to adult learners.

Pokeball and Robotiq. Source: Robotiq
Pokeball and Robotiq. Source: Robotiq

You may be reloading this page trying to figure out if the title of this blog post got mixed up with something else. No, you read it correctly, I am going to outline similarities between Industry 4.0 and Pokémon Go.

First off, if you aren’t familiar with the term Industry 4.0, or if you weren’t born after 1990 and you don’t know what a Pokémon is, fear not: a crash course in both subjects is coming up.

The global robotics industry is also undergoing a major transformation. Market intelligence firm Tractica released a report in November 2015 forecasting that global robotics will grow from $28.3 billion worldwide in 2015 to $151.7 billion by 2020. What’s especially significant is that this market share will encompass mostly non-industrial robots, including segments like consumer, enterprise, medical, military, UAVs, and autonomous vehicles. Tractica anticipates an increase in annual robots shipments from 8.8 million in 2015 to 61.4 million by 2020; in fact, by 2020 over half of this volume will come from consumer robots.

Social media concept - world map with social media icon

As everyone starts to look for “the big technology trends of 2016”, it seems that one technology is overshadowing all others – the Internet of Things. We take a look at why robotics is actually ahead of the game with the IoT trend, and show that some industrial robotic companies have been involved with it for 10 years already. 

image: hjl/flickr
image: hjl/flickr

Anupam Chander’s paper, “Robots, the Internet of Things and the future of trade,” is the first effort to locate and analyze these complimentary technologies within an international trading framework. In this We Robot 2015 panel titled Robot Passports, Chander asks whether international law – that ultimately seeks to liberalize the exchange of both goods and services – can help stave off attempts to erect border barriers to this new type of trade.

As our homes become increasingly automated, will we eventually be living inside what is essentially a robot? Given that smart homes can collect data and learn about your daily habits, and come up with the optimum time to turn on/off different devices in the home, what should this giant robot optimize for?

by   -   February 3, 2014

internet-of-things-stats

They want to communicate more accurately, resolve issues faster and with higher levels of satisfaction than at present. They also want to enable more complex communication. And they want to do it amiably.



Autonomous Bricklaying by FBR
September 18, 2019


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