Robohub.org
ep.

220

podcast
 

Teach Xemo to Move with Jeff Sprenger

by
31 October 2016



share this:


xemo_jpg

In this episode, Abate De Mey interviews Jeff Sprenger, founder of the startup Xemory in Vermont, USA. At Xemory they are developing a robot simulation game called Xemo, where players learn to animate virtual robots.

Complex motion at each joint is broken down into its more fundamental components, called degrees of freedom. Players are faced with the challenge of controlling the several degrees of freedom to recreate lifelike motions such as crawling, walking, jumping, and even dancing. These challenges are similar to the ones faced by roboticists trying to develop lifelike, robust and balanced motions for legged robots.

Sprenger discusses the unique ways different age groups and genders interact with the software. Through incorporating feedback from the students, Sprenger adds new activities and challenges to keep students engaged and challenged, improving their understanding of robot control.

Jeff Sprenger
JeffPicJeff Sprenger is the founder and CEO of Xemory Software, creator of the Xemo Robot Simulation game. Jeff founded Xemory in 2014 when he received an NSF grant to develop interactive robotics software for STEM education. The company received a second, follow up grant in 2015 to further develop and bring Xemo to market. Jeff has worked in scientific and business software for over 30 years, with eleven years as VP of Technology at MBF Bioscience. Jeff is also the co-organizer for Vermont’s monthly game developer meetup.

Links:



tags: , , , ,


Abate De Mey Founder of Fluid Dev, Hiring Platform for Robotics
Abate De Mey Founder of Fluid Dev, Hiring Platform for Robotics





Related posts :



Engineers devise a modular system to produce efficient, scalable aquabots

The system’s simple repeating elements can assemble into swimming forms ranging from eel-like to wing-shaped.
07 February 2023, by

Microelectronics give researchers a remote control for biological robots

First, they walked. Then, they saw the light. Now, miniature biological robots have gained a new trick: remote control.
05 February 2023, by

Robot Talk Episode 35 – Interview with Emily S. Cross

In this week's episode of the Robot Talk podcast, host Claire Asher chatted to Professor Emily S. Cross from the University of Glasgow and Western Sydney University all about neuroscience, social learning, and human-robot interaction.
03 February 2023, by

Sea creatures inspire marine robots which can operate in extra-terrestrial oceans

Scientists at the University of Bristol have drawn on the design and life of a mysterious zooplankton to develop underwater robots.
02 February 2023, by

Our future could be full of undying, self-repairing robots – here’s how

Could it be that future AI systems will need robotic “bodies” to interact with the world? If so, will nightmarish ideas like the self-repairing, shape-shifting T-1000 robot from the Terminator 2 movie come to fruition? And could a robot be created that could “live” forever?
01 February 2023, by

Sensing with purpose

Fadel Adib uses wireless technologies to sense the world in new ways, taking aim at sweeping problems such as food insecurity, climate change, and access to health care.
29 January 2023, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association