Robohub.org
 

This robotic prosthetic hand can be made for just $1000

by
11 September 2013



share this:

The Dextrus hand is a robotic hand that can be put together for well under £650 ($1000) and offers much of the functionality of a human hand. Existing prosthetic hands are magnificent devices, capable of providing a large amount of dexterity using a simple control system. The problem is that they cost somewhere between £7,000-£70,000 ($11,000-$110,000) — far too much for most people to afford, especially in developing countries. Through the Open Hand Project, an open source project with the goal of making robotic prosthetic hands more accessible to amputees, a fully-functional prototype has already been developed. An indiegogo campaign is currently underway to provide funds for refining and testing the design.

In order to broaden the reach of prosthetic devices, I decided to create a low-cost prosthetic hand while in my final year at the University of Plymouth. I ended up creating a fully functioning prototype that went on to win three awards for innovation and excellence.

Dextrus_prosthetic_hand_Gibbard2

The Open Hand Project tackles a number of problems to bring the cost down. One of these is the customized nature of prosthetic devices. Usually they need to be custom-fitted to the user’s remaining arm, which can rack up medical bills with consultations and fittings. The Dextrus hand connects directly to an NHS fitted, passive prosthesis. This means no additional custom fitting and no extra cost.

The Dextrus hand works much like a human hand. It uses electric motors instead of muscles and steel cables instead of tendons. 3D printed plastic parts work like bones and a rubber coating acts as the skin. All of these parts are controlled by electronics to give it a natural movement that can handle all sorts of different objects. It uses stick-on electrodes to read signals from the users remaining muscles, which can control the hand, telling it to open or close.

Dextrus_prosthetic_hand_Gibbard

Using 3D printing offers vast benefits to the project, because the user can select any colour, it’s easy to switch from a right hand to a left hand, and parts can be re-printed with ease should anything break.

To take this project to the next level, I need to design and prototype the rest of the electronics and build everything onto printed circuit boards. The design of the hand needs to be refined and tested to make sure that it’s robust and functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.

This is why I’m using crowd-funding to raise the money to support the project and have launched a campaign on indiegogo. If the crowd-funding campaign is successful, the money will go towards funding the project for an entire year. This will include prototyping PCB designs, materials for additional prototypes of the whole hand and equipment for assembling the electronics. Since I’ll be working full time on this, some of it will also go towards a modest salary to keep me going for the year.



tags: , , , , , , ,


Joel Gibbard is a roboticist living in Bristol, UK.
Joel Gibbard is a roboticist living in Bristol, UK.





Related posts :



ep.

357

podcast

Origin Story of the OAK-D, with Brandon Gilles

Brandon Gilles, the founder of Luxonis and maker of the OAK-D, describes the journey and the flexibility of the OAK-D line of products
01 July 2022, by

The one-wheel Cubli

Researchers Matthias Hofer, Michael Muehlebach and Raffaello D’Andrea have developed the one-wheel Cubli, a three-dimensional pendulum system that can balance on its pivot using a single reaction wheel. How is it possible to stabilize the two tilt angles of the system with only a single reaction wheel?
30 June 2022, by and

At the forefront of building with biology

Raman is, as she puts it, “a mechanical engineer through and through.” Today, Ritu Raman leads the Raman Lab and is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.
28 June 2022, by

Hot Robotics Symposium celebrates UK success

An internationally leading robotics initiative that enables academia and industry to find innovative solutions to real world challenges, celebrated its success with a Hot Robotics Symposium hosted across three UK regions last week.
25 June 2022, by

Researchers release open-source photorealistic simulator for autonomous driving

MIT scientists unveil the first open-source simulation engine capable of constructing realistic environments for deployable training and testing of autonomous vehicles.
22 June 2022, by

In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks to Maria Telleria, who is a co-founder and the CTO of Canvas. Canvas makes a drywall finishing robot and is based in the Bay Area. In this interview, Maria talks ab...
21 June 2022, by and





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association