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by   -   December 13, 2014

In this episode, Ron Vanderkley speaks with Mythbusters Grant Imahara, and Richard McKenna from The Creature Technology Company about robotics in the film, television and theatre industries.

by   -   November 28, 2014

In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks with Edwin Olson, an Associate Professor at the University of Michigan, about the University’s 32-acre testing environment for autonomous cars and the future of driverless vehicles.

Our newest video interview features PhD student Joydeep Biswas, who works with Dr. Manuela Veloso’s CORAL research group, and scientist Brian Coltin, who is at NASA’s Ames Intelligent Research group since graduating from his PhD at Carnegie Mellon under Dr. Manuela Veloso’s supervision.

by   -   November 15, 2014

In this episode, Sabine Hauert speaks with Travis Deyle, about his IROS-nominated work on RFID tags, his blog Hizook, and the career path that brought him from academia, to founding his own start-up, and finally working for Google[x].

ARMin neuro-rehabilitation device
ARMin neuro-rehabilitation device.

In this pair of video lectures, Robert Riener presents his team’s research efforts in the field of rehabilitation robotics, and describes the vision behind Cybathlon, the competition for robot-assisted parathletes.

In this interview, Peter Corke gives us a retrospective on the differences between the field of robotics now and when he just started his career 30 years ago, pointing out what strikes him as the most important milestones in robotics in the past 10 years. He goes on to share his view on the role of editorship, and the difference between robotics research papers and articles published in a robotics magazine, as well as his perspective on traditional publishing vs open access publishing.

by   -   October 31, 2014

In this episode, Ron Vanderkley speaks with Professor Geoffrey Spink from Wollogong University about his team’s work on artificial muscles.

by   -   October 17, 2014

Earlier this year, the Robots Podcast team came across a story about two 17 year old twin sisters who started their own robotics outreach group. The story about the Tipperman sisters got us curious. What kind of robotics outreach activities are out there to inspire children? Do any of these activities make a difference in getting more girls interested in robotics?

by   -   October 3, 2014
Peter_Corke_Vision
Source: Peter Corke

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Peter Corke from Queensland University of Technology, about computer vision – the subject of his plenary talk at IROS 2014 (link to slides below). He begins with a brief history of biological vision before discussing some early and more modern implementations of computer vision. Corke also talks about resources for those interested in learning computer vision, including his book, Robotic Vision & Control, and a massively open online course (MOOC) that he plans to release in 2015. 

by   -   September 23, 2014

g

Link to audio file (26:36), or listen on iTunes

In this interview TechEmergence talks to Dr. Christoph Guger, founder of gTec, a company that focuses on creating devices and parts for the field of brain-machine interface.

by   -   September 21, 2014

Link to audio file (29:54)

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Edgars Rozentals, the CEO and Founder of Helico Aerospace Industries. They talk about Helico’s upcoming product ‘AirDog’, which is an autonomous quadrocopter designed to record video for action sports.

by   -   September 5, 2014

M-Blocks

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews John Romanishin from MIT, about his modular robotics project ‘M-Blocks’. M-Blocks are small cubes (5 cm on a side) that have no external actuators, yet they manage to move and even jump.

by   -   August 22, 2014

072414-birdly-03

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Max Rheiner from Zurich University of the Arts (ZHDK) about his  project Birdly. Birdly explores the experience of a bird in flight with several methods. Unlike a common flight simulator, the user embodies a bird, the Red Kite. To evoke this embodiment, Birdly mainly relies on the sensory-motor coupling. The participant can control the simulator with their hands and arms, which directly correlates to the wings and the primary feathers of the bird. Those inputs are reflected in the flight model of the bird and displayed physically by the simulator through nick, roll and heave movements.

by   -   August 8, 2014

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews James Conrad, professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, about the history of the autonomous walking robot, Stiquito.

by   -   July 26, 2014

ekso

In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks to Russ Angold, co-founder and CTO of Ekso Bionics, about the wearable bionic suit, Ekso. This suit enables individuals with any amount of lower extremity weakness to stand up and walk over ground with a natural, full weight bearing, reciprocal gait. Walking is achieved by the user’s weight shifts to activate sensors in the device which initiate steps. Battery-powered motors drive the legs, replacing deficient neuromuscular function.