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swarm robotics

Figure 8: Example of a 15 robot swarm of GRITSBots on the arena surface of the second instantiation of the Robotarium.

When developing algorithms for coordinating the behaviors of swarms of robots it is crucial that the algorithms are actually deployed and tested on real hardware platforms. Unfortunately, building and maintaining a swarm robotics testbed is a resource-intense proposition and, as a consequence, resources rather than ideas tend to be the bottleneck and swarm robotics research does not progress at the rate it could. The Robotarium sets out to remedy this problem by providing remote access to a large team of robots, where users can upload their code, run the experiments remotely, and get the scientific data back. This article describes the structure and architecture of the Robotarium as well as discusses what constitutes an effective, remotely accessible research platform.

This paper won the IEEE Robotics & Automation Best Multi-Robot Systems Award at ICRA 2017.

Saga Agriculture Robots

Swarms of drones will help farmers map weeds in their fields and improve crop yields. This is the promise of an ECHORD++ funded research project called ‘SAGA: Swarm Robotics for Agricultural Applications’. The project will deliver a swarm of drones programmed to monitor a field and, via on-board machine vision, precisely map the presence of weeds among crops.

Additionally, the drones attract each another at weed-infested areas, allowing them to inspect only those areas accurately, similar to how swarms of bees forage the most profitable flower patches. In this way, the planning of weed control activities can be limited to high-priority areas, generating savings at the same time as increasing productivity.

by   -   September 15, 2016
Images shows the aggregation behavior that the robots should learn ( final snapshot of an already aggregated system). Credit: Roderich Gross
Image shows the aggregation behavior that the robots should learn (final snapshot of an already aggregated system). Credit: Roderich Gross

We have developed a new machine learning method at the University of Sheffield called Turing Learning that allows machines to model natural or artificial systems.

by   -   May 16, 2016

Europe’s waters have never been busier. Between fishing boats, tourist cruisers, and underwater turbines, marine habitats around the continent have never before needed a more watchful eye.

interview by   -   December 11, 2015

Control_theory_Swarm_Magnus_Egerstedt

Transcript below.

In this episode, Andrew Vaziri interviews Magnus Egerstedt, Professor at Georiga Tech, about his research in swarm robotics and multi-agent systems. They discuss privacy and security concerns, as well as research into interfaces designed to enable a single operator to control large swarms of robots.

Michael_Rubenstein_Robots_in_Depth

Robots in Depth is a new video series featuring interviews with researchers, entrepreneurs, VC investors, and policy makers in robotics, hosted by Per Sjöborg. In this interview, Michael Rubenstein describes how he has taken his robotics research from theory into practice by building cheap and small robots — 1024 of them to be exact.

by   -   October 28, 2015

In the Disruptive Podcast series, Terrence McNally speaks directly with Wyss Institute researchers, exploring what motivates them and how they envision our future as might be impacted by their disruptive technologies. In part 1 of the Disruptive: Bioinspired Robotics podcast episode, Wyss Founding Core Faculty Member Radhika Nagpal discusses swarm collectives, as well as the challenges faced by women in the engineering and computer science fields.

buzz_swarm

A new programming language designed specifically for robot swarms, Buzz is based on the idea that a developer must be allowed to pick the most comfortable approach to behavioral design – whether that’s bottom-up or top-down.

by   -   January 20, 2015

SwarmbotAndSwarmLink to audio file (27:29), or listen on iTunes

James McLurkin works with swarm robots at Rice University, and his unique work on robot communication has landed him on PBS’s “Nova,” in addition to speaking engagements at events like TED and Singularity Summit.

by   -   June 27, 2012


This video is a performance piece incorporating a troupe of 16 quadrotors. It’s a very nice way to spend a few minutes.

interview by   -   November 19, 2010

In today’s episode we take a close look at swarm robotics and its potential use in real-world applications with expert Alan Winfield, co-founder of the Bristol Robotics Lab in the UK.

by   -   September 16, 2007

Just as you don’t really need a machine with six foot tall tires to prepare a seedbed, you don’t necessarily need a machine suspended from a gantry or with legs long enough to lift it above corn tassels to deal with small stuff at ground level. Sometimes it would be nice to have something smaller, a lot smaller, slithering along among the stalks, beneath the leaves.

 

Maybe it moves on little wheels, maybe like a snake, maybe like a centipede. Maybe it has low-set, horizontal snips in place of a mouth, as for shearing off crabgrass every time it grows back. Maybe it uses its tail like an ovipositor, to plant seeds. Maybe it produces a loud hiss to scare off hungry rabbits and deer.

 

Probably it would keep tabs on soil moisture and possess an array of chemical sensitivities for detecting various soil conditions, like whether anaerobic decomposition is happening near the surface.

 

Such a device might also apply dusts or mists to the underside of leaves, for example to control fungal growth with a light application of copper salts, or caterpillars with spores of a particular strain of bacteria.

 

Whatever the details, there’s a place for smaller devices, representing considerably smaller investments, in a mix of machines that collaborate to manage productive land.

 

Reposted from Cultibotics.



ANYmal: A Ruggedized Quadrupedal Robot
November 11, 2017


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