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by   -   August 14, 2019

By Nicholas Carlini

It is important whenever designing new technologies to ask “how will this affect people’s privacy?” This topic is especially important with regard to machine learning, where machine learning models are often trained on sensitive user data and then released to the public. For example, in the last few years we have seen models trained on users’ private emails, text messages, and medical records.

This article covers two aspects of our upcoming USENIX Security paper that investigates to what extent neural networks memorize rare and unique aspects of their training data.

Specifically, we quantitatively study to what extent following problem actually occurs in practice:

by   -   August 14, 2019

Like yesterday, we bring you the best tweets covering major talks and events at IJCAI 2019.

by   -   August 14, 2019


The main IJCAI2019 conference started on August 13th. The organizers gave the opening remarks and statistics, and announced the award winners for this year.

by   -   August 12, 2019

Here’s our daily update in tweets, live from IJCAI (International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence) in Macau. Like yesterday, we’ll be covering tutorials and workshops.

by   -   August 12, 2019

By Nicola Nosengo

Current research is aligned with the need of rescue workers but robustness and ease of use remain significant barriers to adoption, NCCR Robotics researchers find after reviewing the field and consulting with field operators.

by   -   August 11, 2019


The first two days at IJCAI (International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence) in Macau were focussed on workshops and tutorials. Here’s an overview in tweets.

by   -   August 11, 2019

IJCAI, the 28th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, is happening from the 10th to 16th August in Macao, China. We’ll be posting updates throughout the week thanks to the AIhub Ambassadors on the ground. Stay tuned.

by   -   August 11, 2019

By Becky Ham

Guided by artificial intelligence and powered by a robotic platform, a system developed by MIT researchers moves a step closer to automating the production of small molecules that could be used in medicine, solar energy, and polymer chemistry.

by   -   August 7, 2019

It’s time for Robot Launch 2019 Global Startup Competition! Applications are now open until September 22nd 6pm PDT. Finalists may receive up to $500k in investment offers, plus space at top accelerators and mentorship at Silicon Valley Robotics co-work space.

by   -   July 29, 2019

PhD candidate Michelle A. Lee from the Stanford AI Lab won the best paper award at ICRA 2019 with her work “Making Sense of Vision and Touch: Self-Supervised Learning of Multimodal Representations for Contact-Rich Tasks”. You can read the paper on arxiv here.

Audrow Nash was there to capture her pitch.

by   -   July 21, 2019

In this episode of Robots in Depth, Per Sjöborg speaks with Federico Pecora about AI and robotics. Federico Pecora is Associate Professor in Computer Science at the Center for Applied Autonomous Sensor Systems at Örebro University, Sweden.

by   -   July 21, 2019

Corbató in 1965, using one of MIT’s mainframe computers
Image: Computer History Museum

By Adam Conner-Simons | Rachel Gordon

Fernando “Corby” Corbató, an MIT professor emeritus whose work in the 1960s on time-sharing systems broke important ground in democratizing the use of computers, died on Friday, July 12, at his home in Newburyport, Massachusetts. He was 93.

The installation Concrete Choreography presents the first robotically 3D printed concrete stage, consisting of columns fabricated without formwork and printed in full height within 2.5 hours. Robotic concrete printing allows customised fabrication of complex components that uses concrete more efficiently.

by   -   July 21, 2019

A new MIT-invented system automatically designs and 3-D prints complex robotic actuators optimized according to an enormous number of specifications, such as appearance and flexibility. To demonstrate the system, the researchers fabricated floating water lilies with petals equipped with arrays of actuators and hinges that fold up in response to magnetic fields run through conductive fluids.
Credit: Subramanian Sundaram

By Rob Matheson

An automated system developed by MIT researchers designs and 3-D prints complex robotic parts called actuators that are optimized according to an enormous number of specifications. In short, the system does automatically what is virtually impossible for humans to do by hand.  

by   -   July 21, 2019
A devoted teacher and cherished colleague, Patrick Winston led CSAIL’s Genesis Group, which focused on developing AI systems that have human-like intelligence, including the ability to tell, perceive and comprehend stories.
Photo: Jason Dorfman/MIT CSAIL

By Adam Conner-Simons and Rachel Gordon

Patrick Winston, a beloved professor and computer scientist at MIT, died on July 19 at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He was 76.
 
A professor at MIT for almost 50 years, Winston was director of MIT’s Artificial Intelligence Laboratory from 1972 to 1997 before it merged with the Laboratory for Computer Science to become MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).

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