Robohub.org
ep.

255

podcast
 

Learning about Legged Locomotion from Birds with Monica Daley

by
04 March 2018



share this:



In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks with Monica Daley about learning from birds about legged locomotion. To do this, Daley analyzes the gaits of guineafowl in various experiments to understand the mechanical principles underlying gaits, such as energetic economy, mechanical limits, and how the birds avoid injury. She then tests her ideas about legged locomotion on legged robots with collaborators, including Jonathan Hurst from Oregon State University. Daley also speaks about her experience with interdisciplinary collaborations. 

Monica Daley

Monica Daley earned an HBSc in Biology with a Chemistry minor at the University of Utah, where she was inspired to pursue an academic career through her research on human locomotor-ventilatory integration with Dennis Bramble and David Carrier. Daley then spent a year as a research technician at the University of Utah, investigating motor control of singing in zebra finches in the lab of Franz Goller. These experiences initiated a long-standing fascination with the interplay of mechanics and neural control.

Daley went on to Harvard University, where she earned her MA and PhD in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. Her research on muscle-tendon dynamics and biomechanics of avian bipedal locomotion was supported by a prestigious Predoctoral Fellowship award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and supervised by Andrew Biewener at the Concord Field Station of Harvard University (CFS Website).

After completing her PhD, Daley was awarded a Research Fellowship by the U.S. National Science Foundation to develop models of the dynamics and control of bipedal locomotion, working with Dan Ferris in the Human Neuromechanics Lab at University of Michigan, in collaboration with Auke Ijspeert in the Biologically Inspired Robotics Group at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne.

Daley is a faculty member of the Structure and Motion Lab, where she leads research in Comparative Neuromechanics— a field that seeks to understand the interplay of morphology, mechanics and sensorimotor control that influences how animals move through their environment.

 

Links



tags: , , , , ,


Audrow Nash is a Software Engineer at Open Robotics and the host of the Sense Think Act Podcast
Audrow Nash is a Software Engineer at Open Robotics and the host of the Sense Think Act Podcast





Related posts :



ep.

340

podcast

NVIDIA and ROS Teaming Up To Accelerate Robotics Development, with Amit Goel

Amit Goel, Director of Product Management for Autonomous Machines at NVIDIA, discusses the new collaboration between Open Robotics and NVIDIA. The collaboration will dramatically improve the way ROS and NVIDIA's line of products such as Isaac SIM and the Jetson line of embedded boards operate together.
23 October 2021, by

One giant leap for the mini cheetah

A new control system, demonstrated using MIT’s robotic mini cheetah, enables four-legged robots to jump across uneven terrain in real-time.
23 October 2021, by

Robotics Today latest talks – Raia Hadsell (DeepMind), Koushil Sreenath (UC Berkeley) and Antonio Bicchi (Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia)

Robotics Today held three more online talks since we published the one from Amanda Prorok (Learning to Communicate in Multi-Agent Systems). In this post we bring you the last talks that Robotics Today...
21 October 2021, by and

Sense Think Act Pocast: Erik Schluntz

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Erik Schluntz, co-founder and CTO of Cobalt Robotics, which makes a security guard robot. Erik speaks about how their robot handles elevators, how they have hum...
19 October 2021, by and

A robot that finds lost items

Researchers at MIT have created RFusion, a robotic arm with a camera and radio frequency (RF) antenna attached to its gripper, that fuses signals from the antenna with visual input from the camera to locate and retrieve an item, even if the item is buried under a pile and completely out of view.
18 October 2021, by

Robohub gets a fresh look

If you visited Robohub this week, you may have spotted a big change: how this blog looks now! On Tuesday (coinciding with Ada Lovelace Day and our ‘50 women in robotics that you need to know about‘ by chance), Robohub got a massive modernisation on its look by our technical director Ioannis K. Erripis and his team.
17 October 2021, by





©2021 - ROBOTS Association


 












©2021 - ROBOTS Association