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To swim like a tuna, robotic fish need to change how stiff their tails are in real time

Researchers have been building robotic fish for years, but the performance has never approached the efficiency of real fish. Daniel Quinn, CC BY-NC By Daniel Quinn Underwater vehicles haven’t ...
05 October 2021, by

Fish fins are teaching us the secret to flexible robots and new shape-changing materials

By Francois Barthelat Flying fish use their fins both to swim and glide through the air. Smithsonian Institution/Flickr The big idea Segmented hinges in the long, thin bones of fish fins are...
20 August 2021, by

Swimming robot gives fresh insight into locomotion and neuroscience

Scientists at the Biorobotics Laboratory (BioRob) in EPFL’s School of Engineering are developing innovative robots in order to study locomotion in animals and, ultimately, gain a better understandin...
12 August 2021, by

We used peanuts and a climbing wall to learn how squirrels judge their leaps so successfully – and how their skills could inspire more nimble robots

How do they stick their landings? Alex Turton via Getty ImagesTree squirrels are the Olympic divers of the rodent world, leaping gracefully among branches and structures high above the ground. And as ...

A robotic cat can teach us how real animals move

By Mischa Dijkstra, Frontiers science writer / Toyoaki Tanikawa, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka University In the young discipline of robotics-inspired biology, robots replace experime...
03 August 2021, by

Sniffy Bug: a fully autonomous swarm of gas-seeking nano quadcopters in cluttered environments

Tiny drones are ideal candidates for fully autonomous jobs that are too dangerous or time-consuming for humans. A commonly shared dream by engineers and fire & rescue services, would be to have swarms...
15 July 2021, by and


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Helping drone swarms avoid obstacles without hitting each other

By Clara Marc There is strength in numbers. That’s true not only for humans, but for drones too. By flying in a swarm, they can cover larger areas and collect a wider range of data, since each dr...
20 May 2021, by

Robot stomachs: powering machines with garbage and pee

The Seinfeld idiom, “worlds are colliding,” is probably the best description of work in the age of Corona. Pre-pandemic, it was easy to departmentalize one’s professional life from o...
14 May 2021, by

Fish-inspired soft robot survives a trip to the deepest part of the ocean

The deepest regions of the oceans still remain one of the least explored areas on Earth, despite their considerable scientific interest and the richness of lifeforms inhabiting them. Two reasons f...
05 May 2021, by

Researchers introduce a new generation of tiny, agile drones

By Daniel Ackerman If you’ve ever swatted a mosquito away from your face, only to have it return again (and again and again), you know that insects can be remarkably acrobatic and resilient in fl...
02 March 2021, by

Soft robots for ocean exploration and offshore operations: A perspective

Most of the ocean is unknown. Yet we know that the most challenging environments on the planet reside in it. Understanding the ocean in its totality is a key component for the sustainable development ...
06 February 2021, by

Robotic swarm swims like a school of fish

By Leah Burrows / SEAS Communications Schools of fish exhibit complex, synchronized behaviors that help them find food, migrate, and evade predators. No one fish or sub-group of fish coordinates th...
01 February 2021, by

IEEE RAS Soft Robotics Podcast with Ali Khademhosseini: Biomaterials, soft robotics and the Terasaki Institute

Interesting discussion with Prof. Ali Khademhosseini, CEO of the Terasaki Institute, and one of the pioneers of the Bioengineering field. Prof. Ali’s journey from Harvard and UCLA to the Terasaki In...
26 January 2021, by

Self-supervised learning of visual appearance solves fundamental problems of optical flow

Flying insects as inspiration to AI for small drones How do honeybees land on flowers or avoid obstacles? One would expect such questions to be mostly of interest to biologists. However, the rise o...
19 January 2021, by

IEEE RAS Soft Robotics Podcast with Hod Lipson: Can we design self-aware robots?

Interesting discussion with Hod Lipson, head of Creative Machines Lab, Columbia University in New York. Can robots be self-aware? Can they design other robots and self-repair? Why should we evolve rob...
13 January 2021, by
ep.

325

podcast

The Advantage of Fins, with Benjamin Pietro Filardo

Robohub Podcast · The Advantage of Fins Abate interviews Benjamin "Pietro" Filardo, CEO and founder of Pliant Energy Systems. At PES, they developed a novel form of actuation using two undulating ...
16 December 2020, by

A raptor-inspired drone with morphing wing and tail

By Nicola Nosengo NCCR Robotics researchers at EPFL have developed a drone with a feathered wing and tail that give it unprecedented flight agility....
31 October 2020, by

Lily the barn owl reveals how birds fly in gusty winds

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College have discovered how birds are able to fly in gusty conditions – findings that could inform the development of bio-inspired ...
26 October 2020, by
ep.

310

podcast

RoboBee’s Untethered Flight, with Farrell Helbling

In this episode, Kate Zhou interviews Farrell Helbling, postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Microrobotics lab, who has worked on developing the RoboBee, an insect-inspired robot that is the lightest vehicl...
20 May 2020, by

Transience, Replication, and the Paradox of Social Robotics

with Guy Hoffman Robotics Researcher, Cornell University An Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium, co-sponsored by the Center for New Music and Audio Technologies and CITRIS People and Robot...
30 October 2019, by
ep.

266

podcast

Towards using Micro and Nano Robots in the Human Body, with Peer Fischer

In this episode, Marwa ElDiwiny interview Peer Fisher, a Professor of Physical Chemistry at the University of Stuttgart and the Director of the Micro Nano and Molecular Systems Lab at the Max Planck I...
06 August 2018, by
ep.

263

podcast

ICRA 2018 Exhibition, with Juxi Leitner, Nicholas Panitz, Ben Wilson and James Brett

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Juxi Leitner, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at QUT; and Nicholas Panitz, Ben Wilson, and James Brett, from CSIRO. Leitner speaks about the Amazon Pickin...
23 June 2018, by
ep.

256

podcast

Socially Assistive Robots, with Maja Matarić

In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks with Maja Matarić, a professor at the University of Southern California and the Chief Science Officer of Embodied, about socially assistive robotics. Socially ass...
19 March 2018, by
ep.

255

podcast

Learning about Legged Locomotion from Birds, with Monica Daley

In this episode, Audrow Nash speaks with Monica Daley about learning from birds about legged locomotion. To do this, Daley analyzes the gaits of guineafowl in various experiments to understand the mec...
04 March 2018, by
ep.

251

podcast

Open Source Prosthetic Leg, with Elliott Rouse

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Elliott Rouse, Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan, about an open-source prosthetic leg—that is a robotic knee and ankle. Rouse’s goal is to p...
06 January 2018, by
ep.

250

podcast

Learning Prosthesis Control Parameters, with Helen Huang

In this interview, Audrow Nash interviews Helen Huang, Joint Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State, about a method of tuning powered lower limb prosthes...
24 December 2017, by
ep.

246

podcast

Smart Swarms, with Vijay Kumar

In this episode, Jack Rasiel interviews Vijay Kumar, Professor and Dean of Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania.  Kumar discusses the guiding ideas behind his research on micro unmanned aeri...
28 October 2017, by

Robot-driven device improves crouch gait in children with cerebral palsy

In the U.S., 3.6 out of 1000 school-aged children are diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP). Their symptoms include abnormal gait patterns which results in joint degeneration over time. Slow walking spee...
27 July 2017, by

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

By Taylor Kubota, Stanford News Service Imagine rescuers searching for people in the rubble of a collapsed building. Instead of digging through the debris by hand or having dogs sniff for signs of ...
25 July 2017, by

Spider webs as computers

Spiders are truly amazing creatures. They have evolved over more than 200 million years and can be found in almost every corner of our planet. They are one of the most successful animals. Not less imp...
27 June 2017, by







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©2021 - ROBOTS Association