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Actuation

Harvard scientists use simple materials to create semi-soft machines that walk like insects.

Credit: sk.ru


In this episode, Audrow Nash and Christina Brester conduct interviews at the 2016 International Association of Science Parks and Areas of Innovation conference in Moscow, Russia. They speak with Vadim Kotenev of Rehabot and Motorica about prosthetic hands and rehabilatative devices; and Vagan Martirosyan, CEO of TryFit, a company that uses robotic sensors to help people find shoes that fit them well.

A researcher at the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) is developing a bio-inspired ‘smart’ knee joint for prosthetic lower limbs. Dr Appolinaire Etoundi, based at Bristol Robotics Laboratory, is leading the research and will analyse the functions, features and mechanisms of the human knee in order to translate this information into a new bio-inspired procedure for designing prosthetics.

interview by and   -   May 13, 2017


In this episode, Audrow Nash and Christina Brester conduct interviews at the 2016 International Association of Science Parks and Areas of Innovation conference in Moscow, Russia. They speak with Roman Luchin, CEO of CyberTech Labs., about a robotics development platform called Trik. Trik is intended to be an intermediate step when learning about robotics between Lego Mindstorms and programming on an embedded platform. Trik allows users to program with a graphical interface by ordering blocks. These blocks contain code in several common programming languages (python, F#, Pascal, etc.) and the code can be modified directly.

This is the second of three interviews from the conference.

by   -   May 10, 2017

MIT CSAIL approach allows robots to learn a wider range of tasks using some basic knowledge and a single demo.

Would you like to make a robot to grasp something, but you think that is impossible to you just because you can’t buy a robot arm? I’m here to tell that you can definitely achieve this without buying a real robot. Let’s see how:

by   -   May 4, 2017

Teen roboticist Ben Vagle returns with an updated version of his TrotBot—this time featuring retractile toes.

by   -   April 29, 2017

Engineers and researchers are already speculating about the next phase of UI development, especially for robotics control. So far, the leading candidate is gesture-based control—the use of physical gestures to relay commands.

by   -   April 19, 2017

Six to ten years ago, exhibitors at Automate were promoting bin-picking in many, many booths. Bin picking wasn’t mentioned this year because it is an available option these days. For the last six years vendors have been promoting human-robot collaboration in manufacturing. Here’s what I saw this year at the big Automate and ProMat trade shows held last month in Chicago.

What do you get when you put together wood and rope? Well according to Plymouth University’s Professor Guido Bugmann: a low-cost, open source, 2 meter tall robot! All buildable for under £2000. The Cheap Arm Project (CHAP) began as an MSc project aimed at developing an affordable mobile robot arm system that could be used by wheelchair users to access daily objects at inaccessible heights or weights (the extreme case being 2 litre bottle).

Back pain is one of the leading causes of work absenteeism in the UK. In these videos, Philip “Robo-Phil” English reviews the Laevo Exoskeleton—a unique, wearable back-support that aids users working in a bent forward position or lifting.

Felix Von Drigalski, of the Nara Institute of Science and Technology, introduces a versatile, open-source, two-finger gripper for textile manipulation that can sustain significant pushing loads in order to perform tucking tasks, using active perception.

interview by   -   February 4, 2017

In this episode, Abate De Mey interviews two speakers from the Agricultural track of the RoboUniverse 2016 conference in San Diego: Dan Harburg of Soft Robotics Inc. and Matthew Borzage of BioTac. Borzage and Harburg discuss their distinct approaches to advancing gripping technology in Agriculture. Borzage stresses the importance of tactile sensing while Harburg pushes for low cost, soft grippers with no on-board sensors.

by   -   January 30, 2017

A Harvard team quantifies significant metabolic energy savings gained from its wearable gait-improving robot

by   -   January 13, 2017

arm_illustrationSo – you’ve built a robot arm. Now you’ve got to figure out how to control the thing. This was the situation I found myself in a few months ago, during my Masters project, and it’s a problem common to any robotic application: you want to put the end (specifically, the “end effector”) of your robot arm in a certain place, and to do that you have to figure out a valid pose for the arm which achieves that. This problem is called inverse kinematics (IK), and it’s one of the key problems in robotics.



IASP 2016 (Part 3 of 3)
June 9, 2017


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